Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's my code:

# Note: Return a string of 2 decimal places.
def Cel2Fah(temp): 
    fah = float((temp*9/5)+32)
    fah_two = (%.2f) % fah
    fah_string = str(fah_two)
    return fah_string

Here's what I should get:

>>> Cel2Fah(28.0)
    '82.40'
>>> Cel2Fah(0.00)
    '32.00'

But I get an error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "Code", line 4
fah_two = (%.2f) % fah
^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

I'm not sure what is going on...

This doesn't seem to work either for some reason:

# Note: Return a string of 2 decimal places.
def Cel2Fah(temp): 
    fah = temp*9/5+32
    fah_cut = str(fah).split()
    while len(fah_cut) > 4:
        fah_cut.pop()
    fah_shorter = fah_cut
    return fah_shorter
share|improve this question
    
convert temp to float before doing the math or use float literals for the constants (Python won't auto-convert result to float unless there is a float in the operation). –  Paulo Scardine Aug 2 '12 at 3:52
    
What is (%.2f) % fah supposed to mean? –  Joel Cornett Aug 2 '12 at 3:52
1  
@PauloScardine: In Python 3, / is always floating point division (however, it's unclear whether the OP is using Python 2 or Python 3). –  Greg Hewgill Aug 2 '12 at 3:53
    
@GregHewgill: I was not aware of that, thanks. –  Paulo Scardine Aug 2 '12 at 3:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
sucmac:~ ajung$ cat x.py 
def toF(cel):
    return '%.2f' % (cel * 1.8 +32)

print toF(0)
print toF(50)
print toF(100)

sucmac:~ ajung$ python x.py 
32.00
122.00
212.00
share|improve this answer

It looks like you want:

fah_two = "%.2f" % fah

The result of the % formatting operator is a string, so you don't need fah_string because fah_two is already a string.

share|improve this answer

Further, I think temp * 9 / 5 should be temp * 9 / 5.0.

share|improve this answer
    
That wouldn't matter if temp is a float as seems to be the case there, but it might be surprising if someone passes an int to the function. –  gnibbler Aug 2 '12 at 4:16
    
In Python 3, / is always floating point division (however, it's unclear whether the OP is using Python 2 or Python 3). –  Greg Hewgill Aug 2 '12 at 4:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.