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This question is based on Andrei's answer to my question on signature constraints.

struct S(int x, int y) {
  void fun(T)(T t) if (is(T U == S!(a, b), int a, int b)) { }
}

template s(int a, int b) {
  enum result = S!(a,b)();
  alias result s;
}

void main() {

  auto s1 = S!(1, 1)();
  auto s2 = S!(2, 2)();
  auto s3 = s!(3, 3);
  auto s4 = s!(4, 4);

  s1.fun(s1);  // ok
  s1.fun(s2);  // ok
  s1.fun(s3);  // compile error
  s3.fun(s1);  // ok
  s3.fun(s3);  // compile error
  s3.fun(s4);  // compile error
}

I don't understand why the code is producing compile errors. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
just a guess: isn't it problematic to use alias result s; when s is also the function name ? –  alfasin Aug 2 '12 at 4:51
    
Wow, brief checking of typeid's and similar shows that there is something interesting happening there. Alias s is not required here ("enum s = " is enough), but that is not the problem. –  Михаил Страшун Aug 2 '12 at 11:24
    
@alfasin no, alias is not a problem. You could replace the entire template with @property auto s(int a, int b)() { return S!(a,b)(); } and you would still get the same errors. –  Arlen Aug 2 '12 at 12:26
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, I wouldn't recommend using a naked template to generate an instance of an object/struct, because you're essentially requiring the object to be CTFE-able. If you need an instance your best option is to return it from a templated function:

@property S!(a, b) s(int a, int b)()
{
    return S!(a, b)();
}

However this still doesn't seem to work with the template constraint. I think this has to be a front-end bug. From what I can tell it seems that the type returned cannot be properly checked in the is() expression unless it was already instantiated somewhere else, e.g.:

struct S(int x, int y) 
{
    void fun(T)(T t) 
        if (is(T U == S!(a, b), int a, int b))
    {

    }
}

@property S!(a, b) s(int a, int b)()
{
    return S!(a, b)();
}

void main() 
{
    auto s1 = S!(1, 1)();
    auto s2 = S!(2, 2)();  // comment out and you get errors in fun() call
    auto s3 = s!(2, 2);
    s1.fun(s3);
}

I'll file this as a bug.

Edit: Filed as Issue 8493.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I hate it when funny looking behavior turns to be a boring dmd bug. Out of curiosity - how did you get an idea of checking addition of implicit instantiation? Some logical conclusion or checking dmd source? –  Михаил Страшун Aug 2 '12 at 15:12
    
Well I know that a template that's instantiated with the same parameters from multiple places is the same template instance. I don't know how this is internally programmed, but my hunch is that DMD collects all instances and then uses that in the is() expression check, and here the template instance in s() wasn't added to the collection. That's just a wild assumption though. –  Andrej M. Aug 2 '12 at 16:54
    
I'm fairly sure it's because templates with the same parameters get mangled to the same identifier, so the linker merges them. There's definitely some caching going on as well though. –  FeepingCreature Aug 3 '12 at 0:45
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