Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

See http://jsfiddle.net/cgWdF/3/

Works fine in every browser*, except the latest opera.

*Haven't tested below IE9

Should have specified, It needs to return true or false, I'm not using it to bind an event.

share|improve this question
    
jQuery's .hover handler wouldn't work for you? –  Fabrício Matté Aug 2 '12 at 4:42
    
Unfortunately, no. I can't use .hover in an if statement, which is what i need. –  user1429671 Aug 2 '12 at 4:46
    
Well, whatever you need it to do, you can use the .data() inside that handler and check against that data. –  Fabrício Matté Aug 2 '12 at 4:47
    
I don't get it all? Why can't you just bind a handler to the mouseover event. Why would you need to use a pseudo class for this ? –  adeneo Aug 2 '12 at 4:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

jQuery's .hover works in Opera 12.

var $sample = $("#sample");
$sample.hover(function() {
   $sample.css("background", "yellow");
}, function() {
    $sample.css("background", "");
});

Fiddle

Or, using .data to store the hovered status and test against it (similar to your original fiddle):

var $sample = $("#sample");
$sample.hover(function() {
   $(this).data('hovering', true);
}, function() {
   $(this).data('hovering', false);
});

setInterval(function(){
    var $sample = $("#sample");
    if($sample.data('hovering')) {
       $sample.css("background", "yellow");
    }
    else {
       $sample.css("background", "");
    }
}, 200);

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that's what i needed. –  user1429671 Aug 2 '12 at 5:05
    
jsfiddle.net/cgWdF/9 –  user1429671 Aug 2 '12 at 5:15
    
Nicely done, I'd call .off('hover') before attaching a new hover handler to don't stack multiple hover events to the same element: fiddle, but performance-wise that shouldn't really matter until you hovered it a million of times without reloading the page. =] –  Fabrício Matté Aug 2 '12 at 5:20

You can use .mouseover() and .mouseout() to achieve the same effect. And if you want a delay on the animation, you can use .animate() in the jQuery UI

$('#sample').mouseover(
        function() {
            $(this).stop().animate({
                backgroundColor: "yellow"}, 200);
        });

$('#sample').mouseout(
        function() {
            $(this).stop().animate({
                backgroundColor: "#aaa"}, 200);
        });

http://jsfiddle.net/cgWdF/8/

share|improve this answer

As of jQuery 1.9.1, the other browsers have caught up with Opera - it doesn't work there any more either now. "it" being .is(":hover"), as investigated by your fiddle.

I wrote a workaround for .is(":hover"), see fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/mathheadinclouds/BxL4w/

function mouseIsOver(what){
    return $(what).is(":hover");
}
function mouseIsOverWorkaround(what){
    var temp = $(what).parent().find(":hover");
    return temp.length == 1 && temp[0] == what;
}
function mo(what){
    return document.getElementById("workaround").checked ? mouseIsOverWorkaround(what) : mouseIsOver(what);
}
setInterval(function(){
    var theBox = $("#theBox");
    if(mo(theBox[0])) {
       theBox.css("background", "yellow");
    } else {
       theBox.css("background", "");
    }
}, 200);

and the html

<input type="checkbox" id="workaround"/>
<div id="theBox"></div>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.