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I've my application structured using presentation layer, service layer and data access layer. There are multiple services and APIs which often need to retrieve some data from the data access layer. To get such data, I often need to pass some search criteria from one layer to another. For example, I could be passing attributes like from_date, to_date, email_id, user_id etc. Now instead of passing a lot of individual parameters, I am trying to pass an object, say SearchCriteria. Again, different services/apis need different SearchCriterias.

The question is, how do I make it generic so as to make it usable by all services. One way is to have a SearchCriteria object which holds a map of SEARCH_KEY to value, where SEARCH_KEY could be an enum (having values like FROM_DATE, TO_DATE etc). Depending on the SEARCH_KEY, I could retrieve the key and use it. But this works only when you one layer knows about the type of the value (Integer, String) to expect from this map. One layer is coupled to another, which I suppose isn't good. I went through this question - Map with multiple value types with advantages of generics which solves a similar problem. Is that a good design? Are there any better alternatives?

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3 Answers 3

If you're using something like JPA you might want to look at the JPA Criteria API. With that you could write a basic filter class:

public abstract class AbstractFilter<T> {
    private EntityManager em;
    private Class<T> entityClass;
    private List<Predicate> predicates;
    private CriteriaBuilder cb;

    public AbstractFilter(EntityManager em, Class<T> clazz) {...}

    protected void add(Predicate predicate) {
        if (predicates == null) predicates = new ArrayList<>();
        if (predicate != null) predicates.add(predicate);
    }

    protected <X> void addEqual(Expression<X> expression, X value) {
        if (expression != null && value != null && cb != null)
            add(cb.equal(expression, value));
    }

    protected abstract void buildPredicates(Root<T> root);

    public List<T> getResultList() {
        this.cb = em.getCriteriaBuilder();
        CriteriaQuery<T> query = cb.createCriteria(entityClass);
        Root<T> root = query.from(entityClass);
        buildPredicates(root);
        return em.createQuery(query.select(root).where(predicates)).getResultList();
    }
}

public class UserFilter<User> {
    private String firstName, lastName;  // plus getter and setter
    private Gender gender;               // plus getter and setter

    public UserFilter(EntityManager em) { super(em, User.class); }

    protected void buildPredicates(Root<User> user) {
        addEqual(user.get(User_.firstName), getFirstName());
        addEqual(user.get(User_.lastName), getLastName());
        addEqual(user.get(User_.gender), getGender());
    }
}

------

UserFilter filter = new UserFilter(entityManager);
filter.setFirstName("Joe");
filter.setGender(Gender.Male);
List<User> users = filter.getResultList();

This is just a very basic sample of a filter class, you can add more and more addXXX(Expression, ?) methods and also features like sorting and paging to the filter. Note that you should set the EntityManager by the DAO if you want to separate it from other layers, for example as a parameter in the getResultList(EntityManager)method.


Another solution might be an example object like this:

User example = new User();
example.setFirstName("J*");
example.setGender(Gender.Male);
List<User> users = userDao.find(example);

where your DAO implementation does the filtering itself.

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The first solution you suggested works for the data access layer, but I don't think exposing hibernate layer stuff to service layer is a good idea. For the 2nd solution, it is similar to what I suggested. I was trying if I could make it generic enough (like a map). –  Swapnil Aug 2 '12 at 7:28
    
@SwapnilS The idea about the example object (2nd solution) is to keep it type-safe. Consider interface Dao<T> { List<T> find(T example); } as a generic DAO interface. –  jabu.10245 Aug 3 '12 at 13:12

You can do something like this

Write Enum to hold your parameterKeys

enum ParameterKeys {

  SERIAL_NUMBER,
  SEARCH_KEY,
  FROM_DATE,
  ISVALID

}

write a class which hold the parameter Values

public class Parameter {

    private Object value;
    private Class<?> clazz;

    public Parameter(Object value) {
        setValue(value);
    }

    public void setValue(Object value) {
        this.value = value;
        this.clazz = value.getClass();
    }

    public Object getValue() {
        return clazz.cast(value);
    }

}

now try making the parameter Map

 public class Main {

        public static void main(String[] args) {
            Map<String,Parameter> _params = new HashMap<String, Parameter>();
            _params.put(ParameterKeys.SERIAL_NUMBER, new Parameter(1));
                 _params.put(ParameterKeys.SEARCH_KEY, new Parameter("query"));
            _params.put(ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE, new Parameter(new Date()));
            _params.put(ParameterKeys.ISVALID, new Parameter(1));
        System.out.println(_params.get(ParameterKeys.SERIAL_NUMBER).getValue().getClass().getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(_params.get(ParameterKeys.SEARCH_KEY).getValue().getClass().getCanonicalName());     System.out.println(_params.get(ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE).getValue().getClass().getCanonicalName());    System.out.println(_params.get(ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE).getValue().getClass().getCanonicalName());

        }

    }

Output will be :

java.lang.Integer
java.lang.String
java.util.Date
java.lang.Boolean

You can pass this map around to different Levels

share|improve this answer
    
How can I prevent a value of incorrect type from being added for some key. For example, _params.put(ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE, "someString") won't fail at compile time, will it? –  Swapnil Aug 2 '12 at 5:37
    
no it wont fail at compile time. is resolving it at run time enough for you? –  Byter Aug 2 '12 at 5:45
    
That wouldn't be a problem as such, but I wouldn't risk something fail at runtime. –  Swapnil Aug 2 '12 at 7:25

If handling at Runtime is enough you can try this

public enum ParameterKeys {

  SERIAL_NUMBER {
      public Class<?> getType() {
          return Integer.class;
      }
  },
  SEARCH_KEY{
      public Class<?> getType() {
          return String.class;
      }
  },
  FROM_DATE{
      public Class<?> getType() {
          return Date.class;
      }
  },
  ISVALID{
      public Class<?> getType() {
          return Boolean.class;
      }
  };

public abstract Class<?> getType();

}

public class Parameter {

private Object value;
private Class<?> clazz;
private ParameterKeys key;

public Parameter(Object value,ParameterKeys key) throws Exception {
    this.key = key;
    setValue(value);
}

public void setValue(Object value) throws Exception{
    this.value = value;
    this.clazz = value.getClass();
    if(!clazz.getCanonicalName().equals(key.getType().getCanonicalName())) {
        throw new Exception("Type Mismatch between Parameter Key : " + key + " and Value : " + value);
    }
}

public Object getValue() {
    return clazz.cast(value);
}

}

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<ParameterKeys,Parameter> _params = new HashMap<ParameterKeys, Parameter>();
    try {
    _params.put(ParameterKeys.SERIAL_NUMBER, new Parameter(1,ParameterKeys.SERIAL_NUMBER));
    _params.put(ParameterKeys.SEARCH_KEY, new Parameter("query",ParameterKeys.SEARCH_KEY));
    _params.put(ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE, new Parameter(new Date(),ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE));
    _params.put(ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE, new Parameter(true,ParameterKeys.FROM_DATE));
    } catch(Exception e) {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

}

}

This will print out the following exception

Type Mismatch between Parameter Key : FROM_DATE and Value : true

share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned in the previous comment, it is always better to ensure compile-time type checking. –  Swapnil Aug 2 '12 at 16:53

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