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I have a demo program for understanding of friend function. I am stuck up with errors related to forward declaration stuff, I guess.

I have a point class which has x & y co-ordinates. The line class has two objects of point class. Now I have a function in line class which will calculate the slope of the line.

This is my program:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class point
{
    int x,y;
public:
    point(int,int);
    point();
    friend float line::slope();
};

point::point(int a, int b)
{
    x=a;
    y=b;
}

point::point()
{
}

class line
{
    point p1,p2;
public:
    line(point,point);
    float slope();
};

line::line(point p1, point p2)
{
    this->p1=p1;
    this->p2=p2;
}

float line::slope()
{
    float s;
    s=((float)p2.y-p1.y)/(p2.x-p1.x);
    return s;
}

int main()
{
    float sl;
    point obj(5,10);
    point obj1(4,8);
    line obj3(obj,obj1);
    sl=obj3.slope();
    cout<<"\n slope:"<<sl;
    return 0;
}

It is giving me compiler errors with respect to forward declarations due to the following:

  1. When I try to define my line class first, it does not know about the point class. Even if I forward declare the point class, that wont suffice coz to create objects of the point class, the compiler should know the size of the point class and hence the whole class itself. Understood it through explanation in this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5543788

  2. If I define the point class first, it needs to know the friend function slope and hence the class line. So I tried to provide the forward declaration for the line class and the slope function like this before defining the point class:

class line;

float line::slope();

class point
{
    int x,y;
public:
    point(int,int);
    point();
    friend float line::slope();
};

Now this gives me the following errors:

friend1.cpp:5: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct line’
friend1.cpp:4: error: forward declaration of ‘struct line’
friend1.cpp:13: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct line’
friend1.cpp:4: error: forward declaration of ‘struct line’
friend1.cpp: In member function ‘float line::slope()’:
friend1.cpp:9: error: ‘int point::y’ is private
friend1.cpp:43: error: within this context
friend1.cpp:9: error: ‘int point::y’ is private
friend1.cpp:43: error: within this context
friend1.cpp:9: error: ‘int point::x’ is private
friend1.cpp:43: error: within this context
friend1.cpp:9: error: ‘int point::x’ is private
friend1.cpp:43: error: within this context

.3. Next I tried to separate out the point class in point.h and point.cpp and line class in line.h and line.cpp. But still here there is a dependency on each other.

Though this should be possible theoretically, I cannot figure it out how to get it working.

Looking out for answers.

Thanks,

Raj

PS: This program is an effort to demonstrate the usage of friend functions alone. Where friend functions are of two types, this is an effort to deal with the second of this kind:

  1. Friend functions which are independent.
  2. Friend functions which are members of another class.

So, usage of friend classes are ruled out in this case.

share|improve this question
    
There's little point in making a member function of another class your friend. Just befriend the entire class: friend class line;. –  n.m. Aug 2 '12 at 6:09
    
Agree, but this example I needed to explain friend functions which are of two types: 1. Friend functions which are independent. 2. Friend functions which are members of another class. The above is the example for the second type. –  Raj Aug 2 '12 at 6:15
    
The friend class declaration simply means that all member functions of the class are friends. –  n.m. Aug 2 '12 at 9:26
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add line as a friend, not just a method:

 friend class line;

Other remarks:

  • separate declarations from the implementations in header and implementation files.
  • prefer full qualification over using directives (i.e. remove using namespace std; and use std::cout instead.
  • prefer pass-by-reference for complex types - change line(point,point); to line(const point&, const point&);

EDIT For educational purposes - You can't declare that specific function as friend as the code is now because there's no full definition of the line class. Ergo, the following is the only approach:

class point;
class line
{
    point *p1,*p2;
public:
    line(point,point);
    float slope();
};

class point
{
    int x,y;
public:
    point(int,int);
    point();
    friend float line::slope();
};

You forward-declare point and change the point members in line to point* (because point isn't a complete type yet). In point you now have the full definition of the line class, so you can declare the method as friend.

EDIT 2: For this particular scenario, it's not possible using point objects inside line because you'd need the full type. But line would also have to be fully defined in order to declare its member as friend.

share|improve this answer
    
I needed this very program to explain the friend functions in particular. Friend classes are next topic, so I need to fix this for friend functions only. –  Raj Aug 2 '12 at 6:10
    
@Raj ok, see edit. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 2 '12 at 6:14
1  
@Raj there's some changes you need to make to the rest of the code (like replacing . with -> where applicable). Also, this is just for educational purposes. In practice, you usually declare a full class as friend, and even that should be done seldom as it breaks encapsulation. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 2 '12 at 6:16
1  
@Raj for these two classes, no. Because to declare a function as friend, the function needs to be declared first. For the function to be declared first, the class has to be defined. But you can't define line before point and still use point objects inside line. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 2 '12 at 6:28
1  
I'm just trying to figure out what friend functions are good for since you're so adamant about using them. It may be unwise to teach somebody about friend functions with a complicated example if they're not really useful anyway. –  Sarien Aug 2 '12 at 7:24
show 5 more comments

Just make Line a friend of Point

class point
{
 friend class line;
 ...
};

There's very little purpose in declaring individual methods as friends.

share|improve this answer
    
I needed this very program to explain the friend functions in particular. Friend classes are next topic, so I need to fix this for friend functions only. –  Raj Aug 2 '12 at 6:10
add comment

You can create a helper functor to calculate slope. This allows you to make the method of the functor a friend of the point without involving line.

class point;
class line;

struct slope {
    float operator () (const point &, const point &) const;
    float operator () (const line &) const;
};

class point {
    int x,y;
public:
    point(int a,int b) : x(a), y(b) {}
    point() {}
    friend float slope::operator ()(const point &, const point &) const;
};

class line {
    point p1,p2;
public:
    line(point a,point b) : p1(a), p2(b) {}
    float slope() { return ::slope()(*this); }
    friend float slope::operator ()(const line &) const;
};

With the implementations:

float slope::operator () (const point &p1, const point &p2) const {
    float s;
    s=((float)p2.y-p1.y)/(p2.x-p1.x);
    return s;
}

float slope::operator () (const line &l) const {
    return (*this)(l.p1, l.p2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please read full question –  Luchian Grigore Aug 2 '12 at 6:21
    
@LuchianGrigore: Thanks. Edited. Regards –  jxh Aug 2 '12 at 6:29
add comment

Under normal circumstances, I would avoid using friend here at all.

Prefer to add a function to point:

float slope_to(const point& other)
{// Not checked, just translated from your implementation
    return ((float)other.y-y)/(other.x-x);
}

And implement:

float line::slope()
{
    return p1.slope_to(p2);
}

This way line doesn't care about point's implementation and will not need to be changed when you implement 3D points.


Here is a demonstration of a friend of a free function (1.):

#include <iostream>

class point
{
    int x, y;
public:
    point(int, int);
    friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const point& p);
};

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const point& p)
{
    return os << '(' << p.x << ", " << p.y << ')';
}

point::point(int a, int b)
    :x(a)
    ,y(b)
{
}

int main()
{
    point obj(5, 10);
    std::cout << "\n point " << obj;
}

Here is an example building on your own code to have a friend of a member function (2.).

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

class point;

class line
{
    std::auto_ptr<point> p1, p2;
public:
    line(point&, point&);
    float slope();
};

class point
{
    int x, y;
public:
    point(int, int);
    friend float line::slope();
};

point::point(int a, int b)
    :x(a)
    ,y(b)
{
}

line::line(point& p1, point& p2)
    :p1(new point(p1))
    ,p2(new point(p2))
{
}

float line::slope()
{
    return ((float)p2->y - p1->y) / (p2->x - p1->x);
}

int main()
{
    point obj(5, 10);
    point obj1(4, 8);
    line obj3(obj, obj1);

    cout << "\n slope:" << obj3.slope();
}

In order to reference point from within line, I use (auto_) pointers and references, since the class is declared at that point but not defined. line::slope() is declared in time for me to reference it as a friend of point. This circular dependency is a terrible code smell and should be avoided.

share|improve this answer
    
My bad! The purpose of this program was to explain about friend functions. I should have mentioned it in my question. There are many round about ways to avoid it, but needed this for explanation purpose. Please see my addition to the question. Thanks. –  Raj Aug 2 '12 at 6:19
1  
You're trying to introduce a circular dependency between point and line. If you want to understand friends, try an example without a circular dependency. –  Johnsyweb Aug 2 '12 at 6:23
1  
Ok, got your point. –  Raj Aug 2 '12 at 6:27
1  
@Raj: I've updated my answer to demonstrate both of the types you mention. –  Johnsyweb Aug 2 '12 at 12:10
add comment

you refer to the line class in friend float line::slope(); before the class is defined.

just add the line class line; before the definition of the Point class

also change friend float line::slope(); to friend class line;

share|improve this answer
    
I had done that, That was my point 2. But it is giving me errors. My post was not formatted for point 2 previously. –  Raj Aug 2 '12 at 6:08
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