Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a single validation class which has various validate methods. like

public class GlobalValidationClass {

public void validatefields(String s) {
//My Work here
}

In methods of other classes, I create an instance of the above class and then call the validatefields method.

Like

public class FirstClass {

public void firstPage() {
    GlobalValidationClass fp = new GlobalValidationClass();
    fp.validatefields("first page");
}

public void secondPage() {
    GlobalValidationClass sp = new GlobalValidationClass();
    sp.validatefields("second page");
}

My question is will it increase performance if I make the methods in my validation class static? Or it wont as the java's garbage collector will garbage collect the objects at the end of each method and there wont be any performance impact if I am following the approach of creating instance of classes in every method?

share|improve this question
1  
If the GlobalValidationClass has no state, why not just make it a singleton? That way you won't have GC, but it'll be easier to switch validation schemes (you just need to provide an instance of a different class which implements the same interface as your GlobalValidationClass). –  yshavit Aug 2 '12 at 6:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will help performance to use static methods, because you won't have to create objects or garbage collect them.

When there are only static methods on a class, it is called a utility class. Typically, you give it a private constructor too, to emphasize that you shouldn't create an instance.

There is another option: You could refactor your client class to minimize creation/destruction by reusing the validator:

public class FirstClass {
    // Create the validator once per client instance, 
    // instead of once per method call
    private GlobalValidationClass fp = new GlobalValidationClass();

    public void firstPage() {
        fp.validatefields("first page");
    }

    public void secondPage() {
        sp.validatefields("second page");
    }
share|improve this answer

It will increase performance if you make the methods in my validation class static but on the other side there will be memory hike(depending upon static methods and variables) as static get memory once your program starts till the end of your program.

and get stats using jvisualvm, its nice tool, by default its in /jdk/bin/

share|improve this answer
    
The only memory they'd get is the memory the class needs -- that is, their actual code. And that's there whether they're static or instance methods. I don't see where the memory hike would come from. –  yshavit Aug 2 '12 at 6:52
    
@yshavit when their work is over, static wont leave the space –  Harmeet Singh Aug 2 '12 at 6:55
    
What do you mean, won't leave the space? What specifically won't leave? The code won't leave permgen either way, and the stack frame definitely will be popped and freed for reuse after the method is done. What else is there? –  yshavit Aug 2 '12 at 6:57
    
@yshavit static: after the method is done it wont freed.. –  Harmeet Singh Aug 2 '12 at 6:58
    
what specifically won't be freed? What is the "it"? The only thing "it" is, if "it" is the method, is some code that's loaded into RAM. And that won't leave whether the method is static or instance. If there's something else that you think won't be freed, please be more specific than "it" or "the method." –  yshavit Aug 2 '12 at 7:00

Firstly, have you identified this code as being a performance bottle neck? Remember, you shouldn't prematurely optimize!

Realistically, I wouldn't expect you to see much performance gain by making a method static. But the only way to find out is to measure it.

share|improve this answer

You can use a static method if you do not any particular object state. Creating a object every time and then invoking the method which does the same thing is a perfect use-case for replacing it with a static method. Its a more scalable solution.

share|improve this answer

If there is no state information associated with that validation class (no member variables) and if there is only one validation method then why not make it static (an utility class) Also when you talk about performance you are obviously avoiding the overhead of creating new objects (performace gain may be seen depending on how often these firstpage() secondPage() methods are called) and there is no need to garbage collect them either :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.