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Musicians write songs. Songs are played on the air.

I have database tables Musicians, Songs and AirTimes. The AirTimes table entries hold information on which song was played on which date and for how many minutes.

I have classes Musician, Song, AirTime that correspond to the tables. The classes have navigational properties that point to the other entity. Arrows below represent navigation.

Musician <--> Song <--> AirTime

From the database, I have to retrieve all the Musicians and dates on which his/her song got AirTime. Plus I want to show the number of Songs played on a particular date and the number of minutes played on that date.

In Microsoft SQL, I would do it as follows:

select 
    dbo.Musicians.LastName
  , dbo.AirTimes.PlayDate
  , count(dbo.AirTimes.PlayDate) as 'No. of entries'
  , sum(dbo.AirTimes.Duration) as 'No. of minutes'
from dbo.Musicians
  left outer join dbo.Songs
  on dbo.Musicinas.MusicianId = dbo.Songs.MusicianId
    left outer join dbo.AirTimes
    on dbo.Songs.SongId = dbo.AirTimes.SongId
    and '2014-07-01T00:00:00' <= dbo.AirTimes.PlayDate 
    and dbo.AirTimes.PlayDate <= '2014-07-31T00:00:00'
group by 
    dbo.Musicians.LastName
  , dbo.AirTimes.PlayDate
order by
    dbo.Musicians.LastName
  , dbo.AirTimes.PlayDate

Can anybody “translate” this into linq-to-entitese?

Update Aug. 9, 2012
I'm unable to confirm grudolf's schemes do what I wanted. I accomplished things with a different technique. Nonetheless, I accept his/her answer.

share|improve this question
1  
What have you tried? Where do you stuck or do you have any error message? Lot of people will help but SO is not a LINQ translate service. – Laszlo Boke Aug 2 '12 at 10:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you have the navigational properties in both directions you can start either from AirTimes:

var grpTime = (
    from a in AirTimes
    where a.Date >= firstDate && a.Date < lastDate
    group a by new {a.Song.Musician.LastName, a.Song.Title, a.Date} into grp
    select new {
        grp.Key.LastName,
        grp.Key.Title,
        grp.Key.Date,
        Plays = grp.Count(),
        Seconds = grp.Sum(x => x.Duration)
    }
);

or from Musicians:

var grpMus = (
    from m in Musicians
    from s in m.Songs
    from p in s.Plays
    where p.Date >= firstDate && p.Date < lastDate
    group p by new {m.LastName, s.Title, p.Date} into grp
    select new {
        grp.Key.LastName,
        grp.Key.Title,
        grp.Key.Date,
        Plays = grp.Count(),
        Seconds= grp.Sum(x => x.Duration)
    }
);

EDIT: To display all musicians, including those without airtime you can use another level of grouping - in first step you calculate totals per song+day and then group them with song's author. It could probably work directly with database but I didn't manage to find an efficient way to do it. Yet. ;) With code, the original AirTimes result is changed to return Musician instead of his lastname and then joined to list of all musicians:

//Airtimes for musicians
var grpAir = (
    from a in AirTimes
    where a.Date >= firstDate && a.Date < lastDate
    group a by new {a.Song.Musician, a.Date} into grp
    select new {
        //Musician instead of his LastName for joining. Id would work too
        grp.Key.Musician,
        //grp.Key.Musician.LastName,
        Date=grp.Key.Date,
        Plays = grp.Count(),
        Secs = grp.Sum(x => x.Duration)
    }
);

var res = (
    from m in Musicians
    join g in grpAir on m equals g.Musician into g2
    from g in g2.DefaultIfEmpty()
    orderby m.LastName
    select new {
        m.LastName,
        Date = (g==null ? null : g.Date),
        Plays = (g==null ? 0 : g.Plays),
        Secs = (g==null ? 0 : g.Secs)
    }
);

You can find a more complete LINQPad sample at https://gist.github.com/3236238

share|improve this answer
    
grudolf -- Your first scheme is very similar to mine. The problem is that it doesn't do a left join on the Musicians table, i.e. musicians that didn't get airtime in the specified date range aren't retrieved. I need ALL the musicians. The problem with your second scheme is that linq retrieves all the songs for every musician, i.e. even those songs that the musician is not the author of. Thank you for your effort. – user1360434 Aug 2 '12 at 16:09
    
You're right, if musician didn't have any airtime he wouldn't appear in the list. I've added a join to include them and modified the output. Didn't had much luck with sorting on null dates though. The second scheme appears to work fine, at least for the included sample data. Perhaps Linq to Entities converts hierarchy in a different way. – grudolf Aug 2 '12 at 20:41
    
grudolf -- I was wrong to say your second scheme "retrieves all the songs for every musician." However, your second scheme doesn't retrieve all the musicians, i.e. it doesn't perform a left join on the Musicians table. – user1360434 Aug 4 '12 at 21:57

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