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I'm trying to paralyze a very simple for loop, but being my first attempt at using openmp in a long time, I'm getting baffled by the running times. Here is my code:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main () 
{
    int n=400000,  m=1000;  
    double x=0,y=0;
    double s=0;
    vector< double > shifts(n,0);


    #pragma omp parallel for 
    for (int j=0; j<n; j++) {

        double r=0.0;
        for (int i=0; i < m; i++){

            double rand_g1 = cos(i/double(m));
            double rand_g2 = sin(i/double(m));     

            x += rand_g1;
            y += rand_g2;
            r += sqrt(rand_g1*rand_g1 + rand_g2*rand_g2);
        }
        shifts[j] = r / m;
    }

    cout << *std::max_element( shifts.begin(), shifts.end() ) << endl;
}

I compile it with

g++ -O3 testMP.cc -o testMP  -I /opt/boost_1_48_0/include

that is, no "-fopenmp", and I get these timings:

real    0m18.417s
user    0m18.357s
sys     0m0.004s

when I do use "-fopenmp",

g++ -O3 -fopenmp testMP.cc -o testMP  -I /opt/boost_1_48_0/include

I get these numbers for the times:

real    0m6.853s
user    0m52.007s
sys     0m0.008s

which doesn't make sense to me. How using eight cores can only result in just 3-fold increase of performance? Am I coding the loop correctly?

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1  
Your memory accesses are very local. You're probably doing horrible things to the processor cache. There's some overhead to the branch/join stuff too and you could be limited by memory bandwidth. –  Flexo Aug 2 '12 at 7:47
4  
Shouldn't x, y and r be made private() by OpenMP? Like this you might get wrong results. –  SinisterMJ Aug 2 '12 at 8:01
1  
@Anton Better yet, they should be declared inside the loop. Pre-declaring variables at the beginning of the function is code smell in C++. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 2 '12 at 8:54
    
@KonradRudolph, it is not "code smell" if you would want to know where this not-random walk ends. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 2 '12 at 9:18
1  
@HristoIliev Then they cannot be private. It’s code smell. Always. Declare variables when you initialise them, not earlier. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 2 '12 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You should make use of the OpenMP reduction clause for x and y:

#pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:x,y)
for (int j=0; j<n; j++) {

    double r=0.0;
    for (int i=0; i < m; i++){

        double rand_g1 = cos(i/double(m));
        double rand_g2 = sin(i/double(m));     

        x += rand_g1;
        y += rand_g2;
        r += sqrt(rand_g1*rand_g1 + rand_g2*rand_g2);
    }
    shifts[j] = r / m;
}

With reduction each thread accumulates its own partial sum in x and y and in the end all partial values are summed together in order to obtain the final values.

Serial version:
25.05s user 0.01s system 99% cpu 25.059 total
OpenMP version w/ OMP_NUM_THREADS=16:
24.76s user 0.02s system 1590% cpu 1.559 total

See - superlinear speed-up :)

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I think this is what the OP wants. It didn't look like a reduction at first glance, since it seemed like x and y were being used for something else. I realized later that it actually was a reduction itself. –  Mysticial Aug 2 '12 at 8:40
    
@Mysticial Yes, because this was actually not my code I was a bit confused about variable use. Getting the data locality right actually helped a lot. –  dsign Aug 2 '12 at 9:04

What you can achieve at most(!) is a linear speedup. Now I don't remember which is which with the times from linux, but I'd suggest you to use time.h or (in c++ 11) "chrono" and measure the runtime directly from the programm. Best pack the entire code into a loop, run it 10 times and average to get approx runtime by the prog.

Furthermore you've got imo a problem with x,y - which do not adhere to the paradigm of data locality in parallel programming.

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1  
"What you can achieve at most(!) is a linear speedup." - Wrong! With proper local data access patterns superlinear speedups are often observed for embarrassingly parallel problems like this one because more data fits in the combined CPU cache. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 2 '12 at 8:57

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