Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a sting, how can I skip the first x characters and then insert a value for every y characters?

For example:

“Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,” 

when skipping the first 10 caracters and then indsert “[here]” for every 3 caracters becomes:

“Lorem ipsu[here]m d[here]olo[here]r s[here]it [here]ame[here]t,”

What is the most efficient, fastest way of doing this in C#?

My current function looks like this but isn't doing the skipping part, I know how to implement the skipping part but the technique used does not seem to be optimal:

public static string InsertHere(string source)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(source))
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }

        int count = 0;
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (char c in source)
        {
            count++;
            sb.Append(c);
            if (count == 10)
            {
                count = 0;
                sb.Append(@"[here]");
            }
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
share|improve this question
    
@weston question updated with my current implementation, which does not solve the problem correctly –  Henrik Stenbæk Aug 2 '12 at 8:17
    
What's the problem with doing the skipping? In the very crudest sense if you set count to a negative number initially it would have that much further to go before it first hit 10 which would basically mean skipping some... It may not be the best way but it is a way. And I assume in your final thing your ten is actually a three? –  Chris Aug 2 '12 at 8:21
1  
When you look at the speeds some of the given solutions take, you might find that some are significantly better when given a larger input string than others. For small strings such as the one you give, I think you'll be hard pushed to tell many of theses apart. –  weston Aug 2 '12 at 8:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You'd have to profile them to see what's best, but here's my effort, I've gone for a string reader into a buffer approach.

    public static string InsertStringRepeatedly(string source, int skip, int insertEvery, string toInsert)
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        using (var sr = new StringReader(source))
        {
            var buffer = new char[Math.Max(skip, insertEvery)];
            var read = sr.Read(buffer, 0, skip);
            sb.Append(buffer, 0, read);
            while (sr.Peek() > 0)
            {
                sb.Append(toInsert);
                read = sr.Read(buffer, 0, insertEvery);
                sb.Append(buffer, 0, read);
            }
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

Edit:

Fixed for edge cases source.Length < 10 or not whole multiple of 10 + 3*x. Also use just one buffer now.

Usage example:

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var result = InsertStringRepeatedly("Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,", 10, 3, "[Here]");
        Console.Write("\"");
        Console.Write(result);
        Console.WriteLine("\""); //quotes to show we dealt with edge cases correctly
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
share|improve this answer

No need to Regex. Try String methods for more performance:

string str = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,";
var rep = "[here]";

var step = 10 + rep.Length;
while (str.Length > step)
{
    str = str.Insert(step, rep);
    step = step + 3 + rep.Length;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice and short code, but for larger strings it's going to suffer from lack of StringBuilder usage as it creates a new string each iteration. –  weston Aug 2 '12 at 8:39

I thought I might as well put my modifications into an answer.

I should stress that this may well not be the best way to do it but it is the simplest modification of your code to do it and definitely works...

public static string InsertHere(string source, int skip, int repeatPeriod)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(source))
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    int count = -1*(skip-repeatPeriod);
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (char c in source)
    {
        count++;
        sb.Append(c);
        if (count == repeatPeriod)
        {
            count = 0;
            sb.Append(@"[here]");
        }
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not very proficient with C# yet (I have a VB background), but the first thing that comes to mind is this:

 string WordProcess(string StringToProcess, string InsertValue, byte NumberToProcess )
    {
        string Result = "";
        while (StringToProcess != "")
        {
            for (byte b = 0; b < NumberToProcess; b++)
            {
                string TempString = StringToProcess;
                Result += TempString.Remove(1, TempString.Length - 1);
                StringToProcess = StringToProcess.Remove(0, 1);
            }
            Result += InsertValue;
        }
        return Result;
    }

I've tried it and it seemed to work fine for me, so you should be able to just copy and paste it in and use it as it is. Not sure how fast it is, but it works at least.

I hope you find this useful/helpful.

share|improve this answer

Not sure if it's faster (you really need to benchmark this):

static Regex Rx = new Regex("(^.{10}|.{3})", RegexOptions.Compiled);

//...
var result = Rx.Replace(input, "$0[here]");

Using a static compiled regex for best speed in a regex solution.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.