Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am using Flask and I return an XML file from a get request. How do I set the content type?

e.g.

@app.route('/ajax_ddl')
def ajax_ddl():
    xml = 'foo'
    header("Content-type: text/xml")
    return xml
share|improve this question
up vote 95 down vote accepted

Try like this:

from flask import Response
@app.route('/ajax_ddl')
def ajax_ddl():
    xml = 'foo'
    return Response(xml, mimetype='text/xml')

The actual Content-Type is based on the mimetype parameter and the charset (defaults to UTF-8).

Response (and request) objects are documented here: http://werkzeug.pocoo.org/docs/wrappers/

share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to set these and other options on a global level (ie: default)? – earthmeLon Jul 29 '13 at 19:02
4  
@earthmeLon, make a subclass of flask.Response, override the default_mimetype class attribute, and set that as app.response_class werkzeug.pocoo.org/docs/wrappers/… flask.pocoo.org/docs/api/#flask.Flask.response_class – Simon Sapin Jul 30 '13 at 8:42
    
@earthmeLon: If you set app.response_class like Simon points out, remember to use app.make_response to get your reponse instance like pointed out in the answer below. – Martin Geisler Aug 5 '15 at 15:52

As simple as this

x = "some data you want to return"
return x, 200, {'Content-Type': 'text/css; charset=utf-8'}

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
5  
The simplest solution. Definitely should be the accepted answer – Omer Dagan May 18 '15 at 14:05
2  
Only this works for python 3. – akai Feb 13 at 9:16

I like and upvoted @Simon Sapin's answer. I ended up taking a slightly different tack, however, and created my own decorator:

from flask import Response
from functools import wraps

def returns_xml(f):
    @wraps(f)
    def decorated_function(*args, **kwargs):
        r = f(*args, **kwargs)
        return Response(r, content_type='text/xml; charset=utf-8')
    return decorated_function

and use it thus:

@app.route('/ajax_ddl')
@returns_xml
def ajax_ddl():
    xml = 'foo'
    return xml

I think this is slightly more comfortable.

share|improve this answer

Use the make_response method to get a response with your data. Then set the mimetype attribute. Finally return this response:

@app.route('/ajax_ddl')
def ajax_ddl():
    xml = 'foo'
    resp = app.make_response(xml)
    resp.mimetype = "text/xml"
    return resp

If you use Response directly, you lose the chance to customize the responses by setting app.response_class. The make_response method uses the app.responses_class to make the response object. In this you can create your own class, add make your application uses it globally:

class MyResponse(app.response_class):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(MyResponse, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.set_cookie("last-visit", time.ctime())

app.response_class = MyResponse  
share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially @SimonSapin's accepted answer repackaged. – J0e3gan Jul 31 '15 at 17:35
    
@J0e3gan thanks. I have expanded my answer to better explain why using make_response is better than using Response – Marianna Vassallo Jul 31 '15 at 21:17
from flask import Flask, render_template, make_response
app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route('/user/xml')
def user_xml():
    resp = make_response(render_template('xml/user.html', username='Ryan'))
    resp.headers['Content-type'] = 'text/xml; charset=utf-8'
    return resp
share|improve this answer

Usually you don’t have to create the Response object yourself because make_response() will take care of that for you.

from flask import Flask, make_response                                      
app = Flask(__name__)                                                       

@app.route('/')                                                             
def index():                                                                
    bar = '<body>foo</body>'                                                
    response = make_response(bar)                                           
    response.headers['Content-Type'] = 'text/xml; charset=utf-8'            
    return response

One more thing, it seems that no one mentioned the after_this_request, I want to say something:

after_this_request

Executes a function after this request. This is useful to modify response objects. The function is passed the response object and has to return the same or a new one.

so we can do it with after_this_request, the code should look like this:

from flask import Flask, after_this_request
app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route('/')
def index():
    @after_this_request
    def add_header(response):
        response.headers['Content-Type'] = 'text/xml; charset=utf-8'
        return response
    return '<body>foobar</body>'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.