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I am trying to implement a messaging system for the application I am currently working at. The messages are stored in a table:

CREATE TABLE `message` (
  `MessageID` BIGINT(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `Thread` BIGINT(20) NOT NULL,
  `From` BIGINT(20) NOT NULL,
  `To` BIGINT(20) NOT NULL,
  `DateTime` DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT '2012-01-01 00:00:00',
  `Content` TEXT NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`MessageID`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_messageTo` FOREIGN KEY (`To`) REFERENCES `team` (`TeamID`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `FK_messageFrom` FOREIGN KEY (`From`) REFERENCES `team` (`TeamID`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `FK_thread` FOREIGN KEY (`Thread`) REFERENCES `thread` (`ThreadID`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
);

Thread is another table that stores conversation threads, basically pairs of users.

When a user views a conversation they've had with somone, they should only be displayed the most recent, say, 10 messages. More messages are displayed on demand (click of a button, whatever). I am unsure what the most efficient way of pooling the database is in this case.

  • Taking out the whole thread each time and cutting it down obviously defeats the point.

  • Have a query along the lines of:

    SELECT *
      FROM message
     WHERE (to = {party1} AND `from` = {party2})
        OR (to = {party2} AND `from` = {party1})
     ORDER BY messageID DESC
     LIMIT {start}, {length}
    

where expressions like {name} are variables. I am unsure how LIMIT works here and if will be faster than my first method.

  • A third option would be to add another field (index) that is incremented within the thread (as the primary key in the message table is incremented whenever a new message is added anywhere in the system).
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The best way to decide what will be fastest is to try it out on representative data sets. It would help if you could include a specific question, rather than invite general discussion... –  Neville K Aug 2 '12 at 8:38
    
This is essentially a paging problem. The right answer will depend on the database engine you are using. Looks like MSSQL, what version –  Jodrell Aug 2 '12 at 8:38
    
For now I am using H2 database, although that is subject for change. –  Henry Henrinson Aug 2 '12 at 8:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here one suggestion that comes to my mind after seeing your requirement is: Lets say if you have to display 10 conversations at a time and if user wants to see more he will be provided a button to see next 10 conversations.

So what you can do is,first select the first 10 conversations and store the last conversations id number in some variable in the front end application.

SELECT *
  FROM message
 WHERE (to = {party1} AND from = {party2})
    OR (to = {party2} AND from = {party1})
   AND messageid BETWEEN 1 AND 10
 ORDER BY messageID 

When user clicks on a button to see next 10 conversations,then again send a query to sql engine with rang lastid+10. That is:

SELECT *
  FROM message
 WHERE (to = {party1} AND from = {party2})
    OR (to = {party2} AND from = {party1})
   AND messageid BETWEEN 11 AND 20
 ORDER BY messageID 

Also make sure you have proper indexes on the tables.

share|improve this answer
    
very emphatic !?! –  Jodrell Aug 2 '12 at 8:40
    
@Jodrell -- Was this suggestion good? –  AnandPhadke Aug 2 '12 at 8:43
    
That was an offhand comment suggesting that the formatting of your answer is wrong. It all appears as code making it annoying to read, which is one reason why I didn't read it all. –  Jodrell Aug 2 '12 at 8:47
    
Oh ok.I guess now its ok to read –  AnandPhadke Aug 2 '12 at 8:51
    
Yes, much better, I think it would work well, as long as MessageID is contiguous. –  Jodrell Aug 2 '12 at 9:26

I agree with AnandPhadke's answer. Just something that is too complex for a comment:

LIMIT is a hack that is used for data where you don't have a useful ID that you could use to limit the number of results. For example when you build a search query, you join lots of tables and in the usual case, there will be nothing that you can use to limit the number of results.

It's supported by many databases (not all, Oracle being one of the most notable exceptions). The performance is usually "good enough" meaning: What are you going to do when the performance is bad? There is no other way to do it.

But if you can change your data model and give it a proper ID that you can use as a limiter, that is always better than using LIMIT.

The drawback is that you will need to do two queries: First, you need the MAX(ID) (because you will want to display the newest messages first). Only then, you can run the real query. Or you can use a subselect. From this point of view, LIMIT is "cleaner".

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