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I have a string like "0189", for which I need to generate all subsequences, but the ordering of the individual characters must be kept, i.e, here 9 should not come before 0, 1 or 8. Ex: 0, 018, 01, 09, 0189, 18, 19, 019, etc.

Another example is "10292" for which subsequences would be: 1, 10, 02, 02, 09, 29, 92, etc. As you might have noticed '02' two times, since '2' comes twice in the given string. But again things like: 21, 01, 91 are invalid as order is to be maintained.

Any algorithm or psuedo code, which could be implemented in C/C++ would be appreciated!

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7  
what have you tried? –  Tanuj Wadhwa Aug 2 '12 at 8:53
    
Which should it be: C or C++? –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 2 '12 at 8:57
7  
A kitten dies every time someone says "C/C++". –  Philip Aug 2 '12 at 8:57
    
Since he's asking for algorithms or pseudocode 'C/C++' meaning C or C++ is reasonable enough. –  john Aug 2 '12 at 8:58
1  
Sort order refers to the individual characters I think, i.e. '01' is ok but '10' is not. –  john Aug 2 '12 at 8:59
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4 Answers 4

Try a recursive approach:

  • the set of subsequences can be split into the ones containing the first character and the ones not containing it
  • the ones containing the first character are build by appending that character to the subsequences which don't contain it (+ the subsequence which contains only the first character itself)
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I'd recommend using the natural correspondence between the power set of a sequence and the set of binary numbers from 0 to 2^n - 1, where n is the length of the sequence.

In your case, n is 4, so consider 0 = 0000 .. 15 = 1111; where there is a 1 in the binary expression include the corresponding item from the sequence. To implement this you'll need bitshift and binary operations:

for (int i = 0; i < (1 << n); ++i) {
    std::string item;
    for (j = 0; j < n; ++j) {
        if (i & (1 << j)) {
            item += sequence[j];
        }
    }
    result.push_back(item);
}

Also consider how you'd handle sequences longer than can be covered by an int (hint: consider overflow and arithmetic carry).

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+1 because you beat me to it –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 2 '12 at 9:08
    
this will generate all subsequences. What if one needs to generate subsequences UPTO specific length(say, 4=> subseq of length 4,3,2,1). –  stalin Aug 3 '12 at 20:50
    
In that case a recursive (or recursion-based) solution would be appropriate. –  ecatmur Aug 5 '12 at 20:03
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In Python:

In [29]: def subseq(s): return ' '.join((' '.join(''.join(x) for x in combs(s,n)) for n in range(1, len(s)+1)))

In [30]: subseq("0189")
Out[30]: '0 1 8 9 01 08 09 18 19 89 018 019 089 189 0189'

In [31]: subseq("10292")
Out[31]: '1 0 2 9 2 10 12 19 12 02 09 02 29 22 92 102 109 102 129 122 192 029 022 092 292 1029 1022 1092 1292 0292 10292'

In [32]: 
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__author__ = 'Robert'
from itertools import combinations

g = combinations(range(4), r=2)
print(list(g)) #[(0, 1), (0, 2), (0, 3), (1, 2), (1, 3), (2, 3)]

def solve(string_):
    n = len(string_)
    for repeat in range(1, len(string_) + 1):
        combos = combinations(range(len(string_)), r=repeat)
        for combo in combos:
            sub_string = "".join(string_[i] for i in combo)
            yield sub_string

print(list(solve('0189'))) #['0', '1', '8', '9', '01', '08', '09', '18', '19', '89', '018', '019', '089', '189']


#using recursion

def solve2(string_, i):
    if i >= len(string_):
        return [""] #no sub_strings beyond length of string_
    character_i = string_[i]
    all_sub_strings = solve2(string_, i + 1)
    all_sub_strings += [character_i + sub_string for sub_string in all_sub_strings]
    return all_sub_strings


print(solve2('0189', 0)) #['', '9', '8', '89', '1', '19', '18', '189', '0', '09', '08', '089', '01', '019', '018', '0189']
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