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I am reading for SCJP and I have a question regarding this line:

Identifiers must start with a letter, a currency character ($), or a connecting character such as the underscore ( _ ). Identifiers cannot start with a number!

It states that a valid identifier name can start with a connecting character such as underscore. I thought underscores were the only valid option? What other connecting characters are there?

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6  
This question is fun to answer for any programming language, not just Java. Here’s the answer for JavaScript: http://stackoverflow.com/a/9337047 As you can see, it allows for some pretty crazy identifiers as well! –  Mathias Bynens Aug 7 '12 at 17:39
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This goes right into my bookmarks bar... –  Gustav Carlson Sep 25 '12 at 14:28
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Regarding "a currency character": UK visitors to this question may be suprised and interested to know that, consistent with being able to start with "a" currency character, Java identifiers can, legally, begin with the pound symbol (£). –  7SpecialGems Jan 22 at 13:22
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Note that since Java 8, _ is a "deprecated" identifier. Specifically, the compiler emits the following warning: (use of '_' as an identifier might not be supported in releases after Java SE 8). –  aioobe Jan 23 at 12:54
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@aioobe Yup. Brian Goetz says they are "reclaiming" _ for use in future language features. Identifiers that start with an underscore are still okay, but a single underscore is an error if used as a lambda parameter name, and a warning everywhere else. –  Boann Mar 21 at 20:46
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5 Answers 5

up vote 209 down vote accepted

Here is a list of connecting characters. These are characters used to connect words.

http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/category/Pc/list.htm

U+005F  LOW LINE    _   
U+203F  UNDERTIE    ‿   
U+2040  CHARACTER TIE   ⁀   
U+2054  INVERTED UNDERTIE   ⁔   
U+FE33  PRESENTATION FORM FOR VERTICAL LOW LINE     ︳   
U+FE34  PRESENTATION FORM FOR VERTICAL WAVY LOW LINE    ︴   
U+FE4D  DASHED LOW LINE     ﹍   
U+FE4E  CENTRELINE LOW LINE     ﹎   
U+FE4F  WAVY LOW LINE   ﹏   
U+FF3F  FULLWIDTH LOW LINE  _

This compiles on Java 7.

int _, ‿, ⁀, ⁔, ︳, ︴, ﹍, ﹎, ﹏, _;

An example. In this case tp is the name of a column and the value for a given row.

Column<Double> ︴tp︴ = table.getColumn("tp", double.class);

double tp = row.getDouble(︴tp︴);

The following

for (int i = Character.MIN_CODE_POINT; i <= Character.MAX_CODE_POINT; i++)
    if (Character.isJavaIdentifierStart(i) && !Character.isAlphabetic(i))
        System.out.print((char) i + " ");
}

prints

$ _ ¢ £ ¤ ¥ ؋ ৲ ৳ ৻ ૱ ௹ ฿ ៛ ‿ ⁀ ⁔ ₠ ₡ ₢ ₣ ₤ ₥ ₦ ₧ ₨ ₩ ₪ ₫ € ₭ ₮ ₯ ₰ ₱ ₲ ₳ ₴ ₵ ₶ ₷ ₸ ₹ ꠸ ﷼ ︳ ︴ ﹍ ﹎ ﹏ ﹩ $ _ ¢ £ ¥ ₩

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I am looking forward to the day when I inherit some code that uses these identifiers! –  Marko Topolnik Aug 2 '12 at 9:22
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@MarkoTopolnik Be careful what you wish for. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 2 '12 at 9:40
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I might throw one or two of these into my code, just for kicks! And to test whether the build system is really UTF-8 compliant. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 2 '12 at 9:49
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if ( ︳ ︳| ︳!= ︳ ︳ ︳|| ︴) ... –  Graham Borland Aug 2 '12 at 11:00
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@GrahamBorland How about if( ⁀ ‿ ⁀ == ⁀ ⁔ ⁀) or if ($ == $) or if (¢ + ¢== ₡) or if (B + ︳!= ฿) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 2 '12 at 16:15
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iterate through the whole 65k chars and ask Character.isJavaIdentifierStart(c). The answer is : "undertie" decimal 8255

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I couldn't resist (in Scala): (1 to 65535).map(_.toChar).filter(Character.isJavaIdentifierStart).size - yields 48529 characters... –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 2 '12 at 9:00
    
there seems to be a few characters near 65k and 12k and 8.5k etc. –  Markus Mikkolainen Aug 2 '12 at 9:01
    
doesnt yield if you say "!isLetter" and "!isDigit" –  Markus Mikkolainen Aug 2 '12 at 9:01
    
2546+2547 atleast "box drawing..." –  Markus Mikkolainen Aug 2 '12 at 9:02
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Total count = 90648, but I'm going to Character.MAX_CODE_POINT, which is probably more than 2<<16. –  Martijn Courteaux Aug 2 '12 at 9:05
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The definitive specification of a legal Java identifier can be found in the Java Language Specification.

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I'm not sure that actually fully answers the (implied) question of which characters may start a Java identifier. Following links we end up at Character.isJavaIdentifierStart() which states A character may start a Java identifier if and only if one of the following conditions is true: ... ch is a currency symbol (such as "$"); ch is a connecting punctuation character (such as "_"). –  Michael Kjörling Aug 2 '12 at 9:53
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It seems that the specification leaves the final list of acceptable characters up to the implementation, so it could potentially be different for everybody. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 2 '12 at 10:11
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@GregHewgill That'd be foolish, considering how tightly specified everything else is. I think that these are actual Unicode character classes, which are defined (where else?) in the Unicode standard. isJavaIdentifierStart() mentions getType(), and currency symbol and connector punctuation are both also types that can be returned by that function, so the lists might be given there. "General category" is in fact a specific term in the Unicode standard. So the valid values would be L [all], Nl, Sc, Pc. –  Random832 Aug 2 '12 at 20:12
    
@GregHewgill is correct. The specification is short and clear, and it's defined by Character.isJavaIdentifierStart() and Character.isJavaIdentifierPart(). The End. The key thing to remember is that Unicode is evolving; don't fall into the trap of thinking of character sets as finished (Latin is a terrible example; ignore it). Characters are created all the time. Ask your Japanese friends. Expect legal java identifiers to change over time - and that's intentional. The point is to let people write code in human languages. That leads to a hard requirement for allowing change. –  James Moore Dec 14 '12 at 7:22
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Here is a List of connector Characters in Unicode. You will not find them on your keyboard.

U+005F LOW LINE _
U+203F UNDERTIE ‿
U+2040 CHARACTER TIE ⁀
U+2054 INVERTED UNDERTIE ⁔
U+FE33 PRESENTATION FORM FOR VERTICAL LOW LINE ︳
U+FE34 PRESENTATION FORM FOR VERTICAL WAVY LOW LINE ︴
U+FE4D DASHED LOW LINE ﹍
U+FE4E CENTRELINE LOW LINE ﹎
U+FE4F WAVY LOW LINE ﹏
U+FF3F FULLWIDTH LOW LINE _

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I don't know what keyboard layout you're using, but I can certainly type _ (U+005F) easily enough :) –  bdonlan Jul 2 '13 at 2:30
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Identifiers are names of classes, interfaces, methods, variables and packages.

Identifiers MUST start with

 A - Z or a - z
 $ or _

Can also contain

  0 - 9

Cannot be

  null
  true or false
  a keyword

No limits on number of characters

(I am not talking about additional Unicode characters)

click here for the blog post with examples

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