Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am facing an issue in reading char values. See my program below. I want to evaluate an infix expression.
As you can see I want to read '10' , '*', '20' and then use them...but if I use string indexer s[0] will be '1' and not '10' and hence I am not able to get the expected result. Can you guys suggest me something? Code is in c#

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string infix = "10*2+20-20+3";
            float result = EvaluateInfix(infix);
            Console.WriteLine(result);
            Console.ReadKey();

        }

        public static float EvaluateInfix(string s)
        {
            Stack<float> operand = new Stack<float>();
            Stack<char> operator1 = new Stack<char>();
            int len = s.Length;
            for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            {
                if (isOperator(s[i]))  // I am having an issue here as s[i] gives each character and I want the number 10 
                    operator1.Push(s[i]);
                else
                {
                    operand.Push(s[i]);
                    if (operand.Count == 2)
                        Compute(operand, operator1);
                }
            }

            return operand.Pop();


        }

        public static void Compute(Stack<float> operand, Stack<char> operator1)
        {
            float operand1 = operand.Pop();
            float operand2 = operand.Pop();
            char op = operator1.Pop();

            if (op == '+')
                operand.Push(operand1 + operand2);
            else
                if(op=='-')
                    operand.Push(operand1 - operand2);
                else
                    if(op=='*')
                        operand.Push(operand1 * operand2);
                    else
                        if(op=='/')
                            operand.Push(operand1 / operand2);
        }




        public static bool isOperator(char c)
        {
            bool result = false;
            if (c == '+' || c == '-' || c == '*' || c == '/')
                result = true;
            return result;
        }




    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I don't understand y was this question down voted? –  Learner Jul 24 '09 at 12:46
    
I've done something similar here: www.twipler.com/experiment source code link at bottom of page. –  Dead account Jul 24 '09 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

You'll need to split the string - which means working out exactly how you want to split the string. I suspect you'll find Regex.Split to be the most appropriate splitting tool in this case, as you're dealing with patterns. Alternatively, you may want to write your own splitting routine.

Do you only need to deal with integers and operators? How about whitespace? Brackets? Leading negative numbers? Multiplication by negative numbers (e.g. "3*-5")?

share|improve this answer
    
yaa..I first want to write basic code and then I will extend to for the cases which you mentioned –  Learner Jul 24 '09 at 12:51

Store the numerical value in a variable, and push that when you encounter an operator or the end of the string:

int num = 0;
foreach (char c in s) {
   if (isOperator(c)) {
      if (num != 0) {
         operand.Push(num);
         num = 0;
      }
      operator1.Push(c);
      if (operand.Count == 2) {
         Compute(operand, operator1);
      }
   } else {
      num = num * 10 + (int)(c - '0');
   }
}
if (num != 0) {
   operand.Push(num);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Guffa: for the last operand...you added the if after foreach..and hence it won't get evaluated e.g. 5+10+5+16... So 16 won't get evaluated –  Learner Jul 24 '09 at 14:04
    
@Learner: I didn't concentrate much on how the calculation is done. Just add a check for Compute inside the last if statement. –  Guffa Jul 24 '09 at 17:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.