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I'm trying to catch up on C++11 and all the great new features. I'm a bit stuck on lambdas.

Here's the code I was able to get to work:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

template<typename BaseT, typename Func>
vector<BaseT> findMatches(vector<BaseT> search, Func func)
{
    vector<BaseT> tmp;

    for(auto item : search)
    {
        if( func(item) )
        {
            tmp.push_back(item);
        }
    }

    return tmp;
}

void Lambdas()
{
    vector<int> testv = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };

    auto result = findMatches(testv, [] (const int &x) { return x % 2 == 0; });

    for(auto i : result)
    {
        cout << i << endl;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    Lambdas();

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

What I would like to have is this:

template<typename BaseT>
vector<BaseT> findMatches(vector<BaseT> search, function <bool (const BaseT &)> func)
{
    vector<BaseT> tmp;

    for(auto item : search)
    {
        if( func(item) )
        {
            tmp.push_back(item);
        }
    }

    return tmp;
}

Basically I want to narrow down the possible lambdas to a sensible subset of functions. What am I missing? Is this even possible? I'm using GCC/G++ 4.6.

share|improve this question
1  
If you do what you want (i.e. using std::function) what errors do you get? Also not that some C++11 support is not fully supported in GCC, not even in GCC 4.7 much less in 4.6. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 2 '12 at 9:07
    
Your second code sample looks good; what error do you get? –  ecatmur Aug 2 '12 at 9:10
1  
Templates only allow exact matches, so you cannot pass a lambda to a function template expecting an std::function. Moreover, the function constructor is not required to reject arguments that do not actually match the function signature, so it is not actually useful to narrow things down. –  JohannesD Aug 2 '12 at 9:15
    
Unrelated to your question, but since you are learning C++11 features, you should look up initializer lists. To create your test vector, you can simply do vector<int> testv{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7}; instead of using consecutive push_backs. –  Luc Touraille Aug 2 '12 at 9:49
    
@JohannesD: Template functions definitely do allow inexact matches. E.g. std::make_pair<int, long>(5L, 3.0) will convert a long to an int, and a double to a long. The problem here is that Template Argument Deduction doesn't work. There's no way to deduce BaseT. –  MSalters Aug 2 '12 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Stephan T. Lavavej explains why this doesn't work in this video. Basically, the problem is that the compiler tries to deduce BaseT from both the std::vector and the std::function parameter. A lambda in C++ is not of type std::function, it's an unnamed, unique non-union type that is convertible to a function pointer if it doesn't have a capture list (empty []). On the other hand, a std::function object can be created from any possible type of callable entity (function pointers, member function pointers, function objects).

Note that I personally don't understand why you would want to limit the incoming functors to that specific signature (in addition to the fact that indirection through a polymorphic function wrapper, like std::function, is by far more inefficient than a direct call to a functor (which may even be inlined)), but here's a working version. Basically, it disables argument deduction on the std::function part, and only deduces BaseT from the std::vector argument:

template<class T>
struct Identity{
  typedef T type;
};

template<typename BaseT>
vector<BaseT> findMatches(vector<BaseT> search, 
    typename Identity<function<bool (const BaseT &)>>::type func)
{
    vector<BaseT> tmp;

    for(auto item : search)
    {
        if( func(item) )
        {
            tmp.push_back(item);
        }
    }

    return tmp;
}

Live example on Ideone.

Another possible way would be to not restrict the functor type directly, but indirectly through SFINAE:

template<class T, class F>
auto f(std::vector<T> v, F fun)
    -> decltype(bool(fun(v[0])), void())
{
  // ...
}

Live example on Ideone.

This function will be removed from the overload set if fun doesn't take an argument of type T& or if the return type is not convertible to bool. The , void() makes f's return type void.

share|improve this answer
3  
So to clarify, the OP's code sample fails because the compiler is trying to do template argument deduction on the std::function argument? –  ecatmur Aug 2 '12 at 9:26
    
@ecatmur: Correct. –  Xeo Aug 2 '12 at 9:26
    
No need for Identity: Just use std::common_type<T>::type. –  Kerrek SB Aug 2 '12 at 9:27
1  
@KerrekSB: Meh, I think it's clearer for this answer, since the implementation of Identity is pretty transparent. Also clarified the lambda conversion part. –  Xeo Aug 2 '12 at 9:30
    
@Xeo : i wan't to prevent the passing in of some lamda which may not return a bool or passes a const ref to a string, when the vector is of type int. I basically wan't to use it like a delegate in C#, maybe that's my problem to begin with. –  Mithrandir Aug 2 '12 at 9:53

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