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This is a recursive program. But I don't understand the sequence of events which take place during this program

#include<stdio.h>
count(int);
main() 
{
    int x=5;
    count(x);
}
count(int y)
{
    if(y>0)
    {
        count(--y);
        printf("%d ",y);
    }
}

the output is:

4 3 2 1 0 ...

But I don't get what happens when the first time count(5) is called and when count(4) is called. Does the control immediately go to the start of the function? Or first it prints the value of y and then again goes to the start of the function count()?

share|improve this question
2  
Try to use a debugger (on Linux that means gdb after having compiled with gcc -Wall -g), run the program step by step or at least with a breakpoint in count –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 2 '12 at 9:15
    
are you asking that how the program is executing? Step-by-step?? –  Sachin Mhetre Aug 2 '12 at 9:21
3  
@chris the program doesn't use void main; it uses assumed return int, which is pre-ISO (K&R) C. –  ecatmur Aug 2 '12 at 9:22
    
yes i want learn the control sequences –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 9:22
    
@ecatmur, It was void when I posted. –  chris Aug 2 '12 at 9:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can easily step through the code to see what happened there, slightly edited code used :

#include<stdio.h>

void count(int);

int main() 
{
    int x=5;
    count(x);
}
void count(int y)
{
    if(y>0)
    {
        count(--y);
        printf("%d ",y);
    }
}

now see what happens during the execution. see the gdb session :

(gdb) b count
Breakpoint 2 at 0x4004ea: file rc.c, line 10.
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Breakpoint 2, count (y=5) at rc.c:10
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Breakpoint 2, count (y=4) at rc.c:10
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Breakpoint 2, count (y=3) at rc.c:10
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Breakpoint 2, count (y=2) at rc.c:10
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Breakpoint 2, count (y=1) at rc.c:10
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Breakpoint 2, count (y=0) at rc.c:10
(gdb) bt
#0  count (y=0) at rc.c:10
#1  0x00000000004004fe in count (y=0) at rc.c:12
#2  0x00000000004004fe in count (y=1) at rc.c:12
#3  0x00000000004004fe in count (y=2) at rc.c:12
#4  0x00000000004004fe in count (y=3) at rc.c:12
#5  0x00000000004004fe in count (y=4) at rc.c:12
#6  0x00000000004004dd in main () at rc.c:6
(gdb) 

The back trace speaks the whole history. See every call to count is "stacked". But none returned. And nothing printed yet.

Now see how they returned one by one :

(gdb) n
count (y=0) at rc.c:13 /* count(y = 0) returned first , it will not cause any printing*/
(gdb) n
(gdb) n
count (y=1) at rc.c:13 /* count(y = 1) returned second, this will cause printing 0 */
(gdb) n
(gdb) n
count (y=2) at rc.c:13 /* subsequent returns will cause printing of 1,2,3 etc */
(gdb) n
(gdb) n
count (y=3) at rc.c:13
(gdb) n
(gdb) n
count (y=4) at rc.c:13
(gdb) c
Continuing.
0 1 2 3 4 
share|improve this answer
    
suppose i have a printf("wdf"); statement after count(--y). then what happens ? –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 9:53
    
you will get a repeated print of "wdf". –  Aftnix Aug 2 '12 at 10:07
    
but why "wdf" is exucuting? –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 10:12
    
when count(y = 0) will return to the place where it get called. It called by count(y = 1). So it will be returned to the instruction after the calling sequence, and will execute whatever there. In this case its a print statement. –  Aftnix Aug 2 '12 at 10:15

It is like a stack of dishes.

 1       2         3         4          5
                                      count(0)
                            count(1)  count(1)
                  count(2)  count(2)  count(2)
        count(3)  count(3)  count(3)  count(3)
main    main      main      main      main


count(0) prints nothing

go to step 4

count(1) prints 1

go to step 3

count(2) prints 2 ...

So to get the output of 4 3 2 1 you need to swap around the count(--y) and the printf("%d",y) lines.

share|improve this answer
    
if i swap the lines i will get 5 also –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 9:32
    
If you swap the lines, printf will be called before --y. So y will still have the value of 5 when it is printed. –  S.L. Barth Aug 2 '12 at 9:33
    
i just want to know when the function count(--y) is called ...does the control passes to the start of the function or it prints the vale of y ?? –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 9:36
1  
@AmolSingh it will go to the start of the function –  mikek3332002 Aug 2 '12 at 9:50
    
@AmolSingh When the function is called, the code in the function is executed ... why or how could you expect anything else? –  Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 4:15

Well it's like an arithmetic progression. That begin with N > 0 and at each time substract one until reach 0. more on recursion here (use factorial example, and you will understand): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion

Hope this help.

Regards.

share|improve this answer
void count(int y)
{
    if(y>0)
    {
        printf("%d ",--y);
        count(y);
    }
}

prints y-1, y-2, ... 0.

If y <= 0, then there is nothing to do. If y > 0, it decrements y prints the decremented y and then calls count with the decremented value of y to print the remaining values.

Another example, this:

void count(int y)
{
    if(y>0)
    {
        printf("%d ",--y);
        count(y);
        printf("amol");
    }
}

prints y-1, y-2, ... 0 amol...amol (y times).

It does so by printing y-1, then it recursively calls count(y-1) to print y-2, ..0, amol (y-1 times), then it prints the remaining "amol".

share|improve this answer
    
suppose after count(y) we have printf("amol") then how will be the output and why –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 9:41
    
@AmolSingh - what do you think? –  Henrik Aug 2 '12 at 9:44
    
it should be y-1 amol,y-2 amol so on ....but dont know why –  Amol Singh Aug 2 '12 at 9:47
    
@AmolSingh - no, compile and run the program, then try to understand it. –  Henrik Aug 2 '12 at 9:52
    
I fail to see how this is an answer to the question. –  undur_gongor Aug 2 '12 at 9:56

A program can be transformed by replacing things with their equivalents: variables with their values, function calls with the code of the function, conditionals on constants with selected code. e.g.,

main() 
{
    int x=5;
    count(x);
}

-->

main() 
{
    count(5);
}

-->

main() 
{
    if(5>0)
    {
        count(4);
        printf("%d ",4);
    }
}

-->

main() 
{
    count(4);
    printf("%d ",4);
}

-->

main() 
{
    if(4>0)
    {
        count(3);
        printf("%d ",3);
    }
    printf("%d ",4);
}

-->

main() 
{
    count(3);
    printf("%d ",3);
    printf("%d ",4);
}

--> ... -->

main() 
{
    count(0);
    printf("%d ",0);
    printf("%d ",1);
    printf("%d ",2);
    printf("%d ",3);
    printf("%d ",4);
}

-->

main() 
{
    if(0>0)
    {
        count(-1);
        printf("%d ",-1);
    }
    printf("%d ",0);
    printf("%d ",1);
    printf("%d ",2);
    printf("%d ",3);
    printf("%d ",4);
}

-->

main() 
{
    printf("%d ",0);
    printf("%d ",1);
    printf("%d ",2);
    printf("%d ",3);
    printf("%d ",4);
}
share|improve this answer
    
that was nice but what if the printf is after the if block? –  Amol Singh Sep 24 '12 at 5:39
    
@AmolSingh Please stop trolling SO. –  Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 6:23

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