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I don't understand whether class should be specified before or after the tag it modifies.

The following in my stylesheet modifies the divs appropriately:

div.idea {
  margin: 0.1cm;
  }

The following does not:

.idea div {
      margin: 0.1cm;
}

Yet, the following does not modify my anchors:

a.idea {
      color: Orange;
}

and the following does:

.idea a {
      color: Orange;
}

Explain?

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1  
I actually did. Sometimes documentation is inadequate. –  Rob F Aug 2 '12 at 12:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

div.idea means a div with a class idea

.idea div means a div within an element with class idea

They are targeting different elements. Without seeing your HTML, it is impossible to explain why you are witnessing behavior you interpret as unusual.

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CSS selectors:

div.idea { ...  // a div that has a class="idea"
.idea div { ... // any div, that has a parent (or ancestor) that has a class="idea"
a.idea { ...    // an <a> element which has a class="idea" ( <a class="idea">text</a> )
.idea a { ..    // an <a> element which has a parent (or ancestor) of any element type (not only div) which has a class="idea"

consult CSS selectors, especially class selectors

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2  
+1 for the link to the reference. –  Michael Piefel Aug 2 '12 at 9:48
    
+1 for reason of voting. –  Rodik Aug 2 '12 at 9:50

A space is very important. A space means "child" of. No space means "and".

So:

div.idea : A div with the class idea

<DIV class="idea"></DIV>

div .idea : A child with the class "idea" with a parent that is a div (anywhere above it)

<DIV>
  <DIV class="idea"></DIV>
</DIV>
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You do not need to specify any element before using a class selector - it merely adds a layer of specificity.

Your first example:

div.idea {
  margin: 0.1cm;
}

This selects first all div elements, then restricts them to elements with class idea.

Your second example:

.idea div {
      margin: 0.1cm;
}

Selects all elements with the class idea, and then selects all of the children of those elements.

The two expressions equate to different things:

div.idea selects divs that have the class idea
.idea div selects the children of idea elements that are divs

In effect, the space makes you select the child

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I see. I was actually wondering where css styles get inherited, and where not. That answers that for me. –  Rob F Aug 2 '12 at 12:53

You css selectors assume the following

div.idea {margin: 0.1cm;}

<div class="idea" id="iGetStyled">...

.idea div {margin: 0.1cm;}

<div class="idea"><div id="iGetStyled">...

a.idea {color: Orange;}

<a class="idea" id="iGetStyled">...

.idea a {color: Orange;}

<div class="idea"><a id="iGetStyled">...

id="iGetStyled" shows you which items will be styled

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