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Is there any way to write an asynchronous function that writes to data to a file repeatedly.

I am getting the following error when I write asynchronous function

The process cannot access the file 'c:\Temp\Data.txt' because it is being used by another process

public void GoButton_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    IAsyncResult ar = DoSomethingAsync(strURL, strInput);
    Session["result"] = ar;
    Response.Redirect("wait1.aspx");
}

private IAsyncResult DoSomethingAsync(string strURL, string strInput)
{
    DoSomethingDelegate doSomethingDelegate = new DoSomethingDelegate(DoSomething);
    IAsyncResult ar = doSomethingDelegate.BeginInvoke(strURL, strInput, new AsyncCallback(MyCallback), null);
    return ar;
}

private delegate void DoSomethingDelegate(string strURL, string strInput);

private void MyCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
{
    AsyncResult aResult = (AsyncResult)ar;
    DoSomethingDelegate doSomethingDelegate = (DoSomethingDelegate)aResult.AsyncDelegate;
    doSomethingDelegate.EndInvoke(ar);
}

private void DoSomething(string strURL, string strInput)
{
    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        m_streamWriter.BaseStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.End); 
        m_streamWriter.WriteLine("{0} ", MethodCall(strURL, strInput));
        m_streamWriter.Flush();
        m_streamWriter.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Yes, it's possible. Make sure that you don't open file in main thread and don't modify using another one. –  Leri Aug 2 '12 at 9:41
    
Where should I modify the code –  CPK_2011 Aug 2 '12 at 9:49
    
The exception will normally occur if you open a stream. Within the given code example you only write to an existing stream, but the code where you create the stream (and the exception will be thrown) is missing. –  Oliver Aug 2 '12 at 9:49
    
Please have a look at codeproject.com/Articles/373479/… –  huMpty duMpty Aug 2 '12 at 9:50
    
Did you open the file in Visual Studio or notepad? –  Erno de Weerd Aug 2 '12 at 10:00

3 Answers 3

Writing asynchronously to the file will not solve this issue. You'll need to wait for the file to be available.

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Ultimately it depends why you're trying to do it.

If you aren't going to be writing too much data to the file, you can constantly open and close it.

Alternatively, if you know when you want the file open and when you want it closed, you can open it when it's needed, then keep it open for writing until the point you know it's no longer needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I am doing some sort of load testing for a web service. Sometimes it returns "Record does not exist" from Client. I want to reproduce the issue. Where should I modify the code to close and open the file. Could you please share with me? –  CPK_2011 Aug 2 '12 at 9:56
    
Well, I'm not sure how you're handling files (I'm new to C#, I'm from a VB background) but I usually use streamwriters/streamreaders (which are also in C#). Streamwriters open the file with their constructor method, and then keep it open for writing to until the close method is called. So every time you wanted to write something to a file, you could do the constructor, the writing method, then the closing method.As I said before, without knowing what it is you want to achieve, I can't go recommending things to you. Are you trying to constantly update the file for some reason? (eg a game) –  Pharap Aug 2 '12 at 10:07
    
I am doing repeated hits to a webservice where sometimes it throws "Record does not exist" from our client. I want to reproduce the issue from my end asynchronously. vb.net is also ok with me. This is some sort of load testing for a web method call. Calling the method repeatedly and asynchronously is what I want to achieve. –  CPK_2011 Aug 2 '12 at 10:25
    
Ok, sounds a bit complicated (I'm not much of a web programmer, my main focus is basic apps and games). You could try creating a streamreader, having it read everything from the file and saving it to a string variable, then have it write that string back to the file, thus making sure the file has contents as well as having the string containing the file's data to use as you please. Either that or use File.exists to check if the file exists, then if it doesn't exist, try again. StreamReaders/Writers and the File object are both in System.IO if you haven't used them before. –  Pharap Aug 2 '12 at 10:36
    
I am getting "Object reference not set to an instance of object" at BaseStream.Seek. How can i resolve this. –  CPK_2011 Aug 2 '12 at 11:03

Well I had the same problem. And solved it now. It is kind of late suggestion but may be help for others.

Include the following using statements in the console examples below.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
Use of the FileStream Class

The examples below use the FileStream class, which has an option that causes asynchronous I/O to occur at the operating system level. In many cases, this will avoid blocking a ThreadPool thread. To enable this option, you must specify the useAsync=true or options=FileOptions.Asynchronous argument in the constructor call.

StreamReader and StreamWriter do not have this option if you open them directly by specifying a file path. StreamReader/Writer do have this option if you provide them a Stream that was opened by the FileStream class. Note that asynchrony provides a responsiveness advantage in UI apps even if a thread pool thread is blocked, since the UI thread is not blocked during the wait.

Writing Text

The following example writes text to a file. At each await statement, the method immediately exits. When the file I/O is complete, the method resumes at the statement following the await statement. Note that the async modifier is in the definition of methods that use the await statement.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    ProcessWrite().Wait();
    Console.Write("Done ");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static Task ProcessWrite()
{
    string filePath = @"c:\temp2\temp2.txt";
    string text = "Hello World\r\n";

    return WriteTextAsync(filePath, text);
}

static async Task WriteTextAsync(string filePath, string text)
{
    byte[] encodedText = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(text);

    using (FileStream sourceStream = new FileStream(filePath,
        FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None,
        bufferSize: 4096, useAsync: true))
    {
        await sourceStream.WriteAsync(encodedText, 0, encodedText.Length);
    };
}

Reading Text

The following example reads text from a file. The text is buffered and, in this case, placed into a StringBuilder. Unlike in the previous example, the evaluation of the await produces a value. The ReadAsync method returns a Task, so the evaluation of the await produces an Int32 value (numRead) that is returned after the operation completes..

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    ProcessRead().Wait();
    Console.Write("Done ");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static async Task ProcessRead()
{
    string filePath = @"c:\temp2\temp2.txt";

    if (File.Exists(filePath) == false)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("file not found: " + filePath);
    }
    else {
        try {
            string text = await ReadTextAsync(filePath);
            Console.WriteLine(text);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

static async Task<string> ReadTextAsync(string filePath)
{
    using (FileStream sourceStream = new FileStream(filePath,
        FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read,
        bufferSize: 4096, useAsync: true))
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        byte[] buffer = new byte[0x1000];
        int numRead;
        while ((numRead = await sourceStream.ReadAsync(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) != 0)
        {
            string text = Encoding.Unicode.GetString(buffer, 0, numRead);
            sb.Append(text);
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }
} 

You can take a look original source from Using Async for File Access

Hope that helps...

share|improve this answer
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  StarsSky Mar 24 at 18:56
    
@StarsSky: You are right, That totally makes sense. I will be editing it. Thanks for suggestion –  curiousBoy Mar 24 at 18:57
    
Answer has the solution in it now. –  curiousBoy Mar 24 at 19:03

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