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I'm working with tick data and would like to have some basic information about the distribution of the change in tick prices. My database is made of tick data during a period of 10 open days. I've taken the first difference of the tick prices :

                     Tick spread
2010-02-02 08:00:04   -1
2010-02-02 08:00:04    1
2010-02-02 08:00:04    0
2010-02-02 08:00:04    0
2010-02-02 08:00:04    0
2010-02-02 08:00:04   -1
2010-02-02 08:00:05    1
2010-02-02 08:00:05    1

I've created an array which provides me with the first and last tick of each day :

       Open  Close
[1,]      1  59115
[2,]  59116 119303
[3,] 119304 207300
[4,] 207301 351379
[5,] 351380 426553
[6,] 426554 516742
[7,] 516743 594182
[8,] 594183 683840
[9,] 683841 754962
[10,] 754963 780725

I would like to know each day the empirical distribution of my tick spreads. I know that I can use the R function table() but the problem is that it gives me a table object which length varies with days. The second problem is that some day I can have spreads of 3 points whereas the days after I only have spreads less than 3 points.

first day table() output :

 -3    -2    -1     0     1     2     3 
  1    19  6262 46494  6321    16     2

second day table() output :

-2    -1     0     1     2     3     5 
27  5636 48902  5588    33     1     1

What I would like is to create a data frame with all table()'s output for my whole tick sample. Any idea? thanks

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Could you add in your question the result of dput() applied to your data, to help us ? –  Pop Aug 2 '12 at 9:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just use a 2-dimensional table, using as.Date(index(x)) as the rows:

# create some example data
set.seed(21)
p <- sort(runif(6))*(1:6)^2
p <- c(p,rev(p)[-1])
p <- p/sum(p)
P <- sample(-5:5, 1e5, TRUE, p)
x <- .xts(P, (1:1e5)*5)
# create table
table(as.Date(index(x)), x)
#             x
#                -5   -4   -3   -2   -1    0    1    2    3    4    5
#   1970-01-01   22  141  527 1623 2968 6647 2953 1700  538  139   21
#   1970-01-02   31  142  548 1596 2937 6757 2874 1677  529  167   22
#   1970-01-03   26  172  547 1599 2858 6814 2896 1681  504  163   20
#   1970-01-04   23  178  537 1645 2855 6805 2891 1626  537  165   18
#   1970-01-05   23  139  490 1597 3028 6740 2848 1724  505  158   28
#   1970-01-06   21  134  400 1304 2266 5496 2232 1213  397  112   26
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If you want the frequency distribution for the entire 10 day period just concatenate the data and do the same. Is that what you want to do?

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I would like the daily empirical frequency distribution, nothing very mathematical like fitting GEV distributions, it is only descriptive. –  marino89 Aug 2 '12 at 14:44

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