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In C#, how does one create a delegate type that maps delegate types to a delegate type? In particular, in my example below, I want to declare a delegate Sum such that (borrowing from mathematical notation) Sum(f,g) = f + g. I then want to invoke Sum(f,g) -- such as Sum(f,g)(5) [this meaning f(5) + g(5)].

class  Example
{
delegate  int  IntToInt  ( int i ) ;

public static int Double ( int i )  { return i * 2 ; }
public static int Square ( int i )  { return i * i ; }

delegate  IntToInt  IntToIntPair_To_IntToInt  ( IntToInt f, IntToInt g ) ;

public static IntToInt Sum ( IntToInt f, IntToInt, g )  { return f + g ; }

public static void Main ( )
	{
	IntToInt  DoubleInstance  =  Double ;
	IntToInt  SquareInstance  =  Square ;

	IntToIntPair_To_IntToInt  SumInstance  =  Sum ;

	System.Console.WriteLine
    	  ( SumInstance ( DoubleInstance, SquareInstance ) ( 5 ) ) ;
	// should print 35 = 10 + 25 = Double(5) + Square(5)
	}
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You just need to express the specific types. For example:

Func<Func<int, int>, Func<int, int>>

represents a function which takes a (function converting an int to a second int) and returns a (function converting an int to a second int). Or to take two functions and return a third:

Func<Func<int, int>, Func<int, int>, Func<int, int>>

For example:

Func<Func<int, int>, Func<int, int>> applyTwice = (f => x => f(f(x));

This can be returned generically by a method:

public static Func<Func<T,T>, Func<T,T>> ApplyTwice<T>()
{
    return func => x => func(func(x));
}

If you want to sum two functions, you might do:

public static Func<int, int> Sum(Func<int, int> first, Func<int, int> second)
{
    return x => first(x) + second(x);
}

Now to apply it:

Func<int, int> doubler = x => x * 2;
Func<int, int> squarer = x => x * x;
Func<int, int> doublePlusSquare = Sum(doubler, squarer);

Console.WriteLine(doublePlusSquare(5)); // Prints 35

(Untested, but should be okay...)


If you don't have C# 3 and .NET 3.5 available to you, then declare the following delegates:

public delegate TResult Func<TResult>();
public delegate TResult Func<T, TResult>(T arg);
public delegate TResult Func<T1, T2, TResult>(T1 arg1, T2 arg2);

(There's more on my C# Versions page.)

Then you'll need to use anonymous methods, e.g.

public static Func<int, int> Sum(Func<int, int> first, Func<int, int> second)
{
    return delegate(int x) { return first(x) + second(x); };
}

Func<int, int> doubler = delegate (int x) { return x * 2; };
Func<int, int> squarer = delegate (int x) { return x * x; };
Func<int, int> doublePlusSquare = Sum(doubler, squarer);

Console.WriteLine(doublePlusSquare(5)); // Prints 35
share|improve this answer
    
Dammit, you get one sentence off an answer and bam, skeeted again. –  Jeff Yates Jul 24 '09 at 13:28
    
Jon: My software is somewhat dated. Does it matter that I'm using CLR Version 2.0.50727.42 ? –  JaysonFix Jul 24 '09 at 13:28
    
@JaysonFix: Yes, unfortunately, the lambda syntax (x=>x*2 for example) and the Func<T> delegate types are C#3/.NET3.5 constructs. To do this in .NET2.0 and C#2 will take more effort. –  Jeff Yates Jul 24 '09 at 13:31
    
You will need to declare your own IntToInt and IntFuncToIntFunc types so that you can do something similar. –  Jeff Yates Jul 24 '09 at 13:32
    
Editing to reflect this... –  Jon Skeet Jul 24 '09 at 13:36

Like Jon said:

Func<int, int> f = i => i * 2;
Func<int, int> g = i => i * i;
Func<int, int> sum = i => f(i) + g(i);

However, if you'd want to create a Sum method for other types than Func<int,int>, you'd have to go with

static Func<T, T> Sum<T>(Func<T, T> f, Func<T, T> g)
{
    ParameterExpression p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "i");
    Expression<Func<T, T>> sumExpression =
            Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T>>(
                Expression.Add(
                    Expression.Invoke(Expression.Constant(f), p),
                    Expression.Invoke(Expression.Constant(g), p)),
                p);
    return sumExpression.Compile();
}

This works for any type T that defines the "+" operator. Just be careful of the performance penalty you'd get for compiling a lambda expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, this is specific to C# 3.0 / .NET 3.5. –  Ruben Jul 24 '09 at 13:37
    
I think you mean "types other than int". –  Jon Skeet Jul 24 '09 at 13:38
    
Func<int,int> actually; forgot to escape the < >. –  Ruben Jul 24 '09 at 13:44

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