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I am trying to use a single function in a class that will start and stop timers which are linked to int values using a boolean. So for example if I started a timer with a int of 0 then that would be timer0 and if it was 3 then timer3 and so on.

The problem I am having is that the timers seem to start ok but when I send them a false bool to stop them they will keep running so I need to know how I can stop them correctly.

In the Class.java the code is:

public void Event(final int value, boolean run, int time){

    if(run){
        System.out.println(run);

        Timer timer = new Timer();

        timer.schedule( new TimerTask() {
            public void run() {
                // The needed code will go here
                System.out.println(value + " Event run");
            }
         }, 0, time); // Every second
    } else {
    }

} 

Then for my Main.java the code is:

System.out.println("Start Timer 0 Event");
r.Event(0, true, 1000);

System.out.println("Start Timer 1 Event");
r.Event(1, true, 250);

System.out.println("Start Timer 2 Event");
r.Event(2, true, 250);

r.Event(0, false, 1000); // Not Working as i need
System.out.println("Stop Timer 0 Event");

Basically I just want to have sets of events get repeated every set amount amount of time until I stop them and there could be many run together. If timers are not the best way to do this then a alternative would be fine but it would need to work the same way as described however.


On request here is the runnable code for my timer.

MyClass.java:

package com.z;

import java.awt.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class MyClass {

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//Name: Event (BROKEN)
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
public void Event(final int value, boolean run, int time){

    Timer timer = new Timer("" + value, true);

    if(run){
        System.out.println(run);

        timer.schedule( new TimerTask() {
            public void run() {
                // Code here
                System.out.println(value + " Event run");
            }
         }, 0, time); // Every second
    } 

    if (!run) {
        timer.cancel();
    }
}

}

Example.java:

package com.z;

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;

public class Example {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    MyClass r = new MyClass();

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    // Event (BROKEN)
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    System.out.println("Start Timer 0 Event");
    r.Event(0, true, 1000);

    System.out.println("Start Timer 1 Event");
    r.Event(1, true, 250);

    r.Event(0, false, 1000);
    System.out.println("Stop Timer 0 Event");

    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The timer.schedule methods that take 3 args repeat execution, so if run is true, the timer will start executing tasks.

If you want to stop the timer, you can always call timer.cancel, but you need to save a reference to the timer outside the Event method.

Reading the Timer javadocs should help here http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Timer.html

EDIT: Here is an example of how this might work

Timer startTimer(final int value, final long time) {
   Timer timer = new Timer("Timer" + value);
   timer.schedule( new TimerTask() {
            public void run() {
                // Code here
                System.out.println(value + " Event run");
            }
         }, 0, time); // Every second
   return timer;
}

Timer t0 = startTimer(0,1000);
Timer t1 = startTimer(1,1000);

// stop t0
t0.cancel();
share|improve this answer
1  
Can you post a short, complete runnable example of code that isn't working for you? –  Jeff Storey Aug 2 '12 at 12:12
1  
This is not runnable code (or at least not easily runnable). Can you add main method that can be copied/pasted and run easily? Please either edit your post with the code or add to pastebin. –  Jeff Storey Aug 2 '12 at 12:37
1  
Once you start the timer in the Event method, you have no way of cancelling that same timer since it is a local variable. Rather than having a run parameter, why not just return the timer from the Event method (might want to rename that method). Then when you're ready to stop that timer, just call stop on it. –  Jeff Storey Aug 2 '12 at 13:24
    
Thanks, i am not sure about the code i would need to do this though as i am quite new to java still. If possible could you post a quick example? thanks –  zeddex Aug 2 '12 at 13:34
1  
I have edited my post. –  Jeff Storey Aug 2 '12 at 13:40

An other solution is that instead of using Timer since each timer is single Thread and its running is resource consuming. You can create one Thread which check the Task Queu. Tasks can be schduled with a period parameter. Scheduling means that adding Task into Queue. And Main thread check if each Task waits longer than enough in queue correponding to its period value.

 while (running) {
     Timer timer = timerQueue.poll();
     if (timer.nextExecutionTime < System.currentTimeMillis()) {
        timer.timerExpire();
     }
     else {
        // nextexecution time degismeden yeniden schedule edilir.
        reschedule(timer);
     }
  }// while

In this example Timer is my own class holding TimerListener. While initiating a Timer task operation is written inside timerExpire method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I tried your code and replaced running with run to use my functions input boolean but Eclipse is highlighting timerQueue, nextExecutionTime, timerExpire and reschedule as errors. –  zeddex Aug 2 '12 at 12:09

Timer will run 5 seconds after scheduled and keeping running every 1second until timer.cancel is invoked.

    Timer timer = new Timer();

    timer.schedule(new TimerTask(){

        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Timer task");

        }

    }, 5000,1000);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but i already have a working timer, the problem is getting it to stop when used in a single function from my class. I tried using: if (!run) { timer.cancel(); } but it continues running. –  zeddex Aug 2 '12 at 12:11

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