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I am a new in terms of PHP OOP programming, i don't understand when and how the following class names are and when shall i use them :

$a = new Classname();
$a = new Classname;

$a = ClassName::function();
$a = ClassName::getInstance();

Many thanks and sorry for silly question:

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

These are identical.

$a = new Classname();
$a = new Classname;

You can use them interchangeably when the class constructor does not take, or does not require other parameters.

Example:

class Classname
{
    public function __construct($var = null)
    {
        // ..
    }

    static public function getInstance()
    {
        // ..
    }
}

In this case you can use $a = new Classname; and $var will take the default value, or $a = new Classname('hello') and $var will be equal to the value passed.


These are both static method calls.

$a = ClassName::function();
$a = ClassName::getInstance();

One calls a method called "function" (which cannot exist - it is a reserved word), the other calls a method named "getInstance". When you use them really depends on what the methods do.

Static methods can be called without creating an object instance.

I.e.

Classname::staticMethod();

versus

$obj = new Classname;
$obj->method;
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thanks , more clear now –  Jobs7.co.uk Aug 2 '12 at 11:13
    
Good explanation. Should have more votes then mine ;) –  Vitaliy Zurian Aug 2 '12 at 11:14
    
@thecatontheflat: Meh, I was editing while they were voting. Always happens ;) –  Leigh Aug 2 '12 at 11:15
    
this makes sense .. really . Nice answer . Many thanks –  Jobs7.co.uk Aug 2 '12 at 11:15

For:

$a = new Classname();
$a = new Classname;

These are just 2 different ways of saying the same thing: Create a new reference to class "Classname" without any parameters (php is more lenient in regards to if () and parameters must be given or not than many other programming languages).

For:

$a = ClassName::function();
$a = ClassName::getInstance();

These two are static calls of the functions "function()" and "getInstance()", thus $a would be set to the appropriate return value of these function. Static means that you can use the functions without referening the class itself (thus $b=ClassName(); $a=$b->function() is not needed instead you can just write it as you did above).

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seem to be clear for me , appreciate your answer ! –  Jobs7.co.uk Aug 2 '12 at 11:18

As for

$a = new Classname(); 
$a = new Classname;

No difference if __construct() has no arguments to receive.


As for

$a = ClassName::function();
$a = ClassName::getInstance();

this is just normal call of static methods

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thanks , fair enough , but can I use ClassName::function() even if method is not static ? or this is strictly to define static methods ? –  Jobs7.co.uk Aug 2 '12 at 11:12
1  
It's strictly how you call static methods. You cannot call non-static methods in that manner. You probably need to do some reading about what static actually means, and what it is used for. –  Leigh Aug 2 '12 at 11:13
    
sure i will , thanks –  Jobs7.co.uk Aug 2 '12 at 11:16

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