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I'm learning Haskell, and to help me learn, I would really like to see the source for simple library functions like repeat, assuming that they are written in Haskell themselves. I downloaded the source tarball for the Haskell Platform, but got lost searching through all the different source folders. Does anyone know where or if I could find this?

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6 Answers 6

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The easiest way to search through the source of the haskell platform is hoogle. You search functions by name or by type signature, and when you follow the link to hackage (eg: map) you'll be able to see also the source (rightmost link on the row with name and type signature).

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There is base package on the Hackage, which contains Prelude along with other core modules. Select any module there and then use 'Source' hyperlink in the upper right corner. Or find the function you want and click 'Source' hyperlink on the right of its name.

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If you want to see the real implementation (the source in the language report is a specification of behaviour, at least GHC's implementation of many standard library functions differs greatly), you can see the documentation for the libraries shipped with GHC here, and when you go to look at the Haddock docs for a module, there's a Source link (for Data.List in this example) at the top taking you to the syntax-highlighted source code.

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The standard definitions can be found in the Haskell Report, as per the answer given by Markus Mikkolainen. These are probably what you want to look at for "learning purposes".

You can also look up the real definitions by looking at the Haddock pages for the base package, as per several of the answers here. However, you will find some of these definitions are quite hard to follow, expose a lot of low-level implementation details, and generally aren't that useful to a beginner.

I would recommend you stick to the Haskell Report.

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This one is the latest one, but it's just a specification, not the real implementation.

http://www.haskell.org/onlinereport/haskell2010/haskellch9.html

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