Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to go through a huge graph (around 875000 nodes and 5200000 edges) but I'm getting a stackoverflow. I have a recursive function to loop through it. It will explore only the non-explored nodes so there is no way it goes into an infinite recursion. (or at least I think) My recursive function works for smaller inputs (5000 nodes).

What should I do? Is there a maximum number of successful recursive call?

I'm really clueless.

EDIT: I have posted the iterative equivalent at the end as well.

Here is the code of the recursion:

int main()
{
int *sizeGraph,i,**reverseGraph;
// some code to initialize the arrays
getGgraph(1,reverseGraph,sizeGraph); // populate the arrays with the input from a file

getMagicalPath(magicalPath,reverseGraph,sizeGraph);

return 0;
}

void getMagicalPath(int *magicalPath,int **graph,int *sizeGraph) {
    int i;
    int *exploredNode;
    /* ------------- creation of the list of the explored nodes ------------------ */
    if ((exploredNode =(int*) malloc((ARRAY_SIZE + 1) * sizeof(exploredNode[0]))) == NULL) {
        printf("malloc of exploredNode error\n");
        return;
    }
    memset(exploredNode, 0, (ARRAY_SIZE + 1) * sizeof(exploredNode[0]));

    // start byt the "last" node
    for (i = ARRAY_SIZE; i > 0; i--) {
        if (exploredNode[i] == 0)
            runThroughGraph1stLoop(i,graph,exploredNode,magicalPath,sizeGraph);
    }
    free(exploredNode);
}

/*
 *      run through from the node to each adjacent node which will run to each adjacent node etc...
 */
void runThroughGraph1stLoop(int node,int **graph,int *exploredNode,int *magicalPath,int *sizeGraph) {
    //printf("node = %d\n",node);
    int i = 0;
    exploredNode[node] = 1;
    for (i = 0; i < sizeGraph[node]; i++) {
        if (exploredNode[graph[node][i]] == 0) {
            runThroughGraph1stLoop(graph[node][i],graph,exploredNode,magicalPath,sizeGraph);
        }
    }
    magicalPath[0]++; // as index 0 is not used, we use it to remember the size of the array; quite durty i know
    magicalPath[magicalPath[0]] = node;
}

The iterative equivalent of the above:

struct stack_t { 
        int node;
        int curChildIndex;
    };

void getMagicalPathIterative(int *magicalPath,int **graph,int *sizeGraph) {
    int i,k,m,child,unexploredNodeChild,curStackPos = 0,*exploredNode;
    bool foundNode;
    stack_t* myStack;
    if ((myStack    = (stack_t*) malloc((ARRAY_SIZE + 1) * sizeof(myStack[0]))) == NULL) {
        printf("malloc of myStack error\n");
        return;
    }
    if ((exploredNode =(int*) malloc((ARRAY_SIZE + 1) * sizeof(exploredNode[0]))) == NULL) {
        printf("malloc of exploredNode error\n");
        return;
    }
    memset(exploredNode, 0, (ARRAY_SIZE + 1) * sizeof(exploredNode[0]));

    for (i = ARRAY_SIZE; i > 0; i--) {
        if (exploredNode[i] == 0) {
            curStackPos = 0;
            myStack[curStackPos].node = i;
            myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex = (sizeGraph[myStack[curStackPos].node] > 0) ? 0 : -1;

            while(curStackPos > -1 && myStack[curStackPos].node > 0) {
                exploredNode[myStack[curStackPos].node] = 1;
                if (myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex == -1) {
                    magicalPath[0]++;
                    magicalPath[magicalPath[0]] = myStack[curStackPos].node; // as index 0 is not used, we use it to remember the size of the array
                    myStack[curStackPos].node = 0;
                    myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex = 0;
                    curStackPos--;
                }
                else {
                    foundNode = false;
                    for(k = 0;k < sizeGraph[myStack[curStackPos].node] && !foundNode;k++) {
                        if (exploredNode[graph[myStack[curStackPos].node][k]] == 0) {
                            myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex = k;
                            foundNode = true;
                        }
                    }
                    if (!foundNode)
                        myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex = -1;

                    if (myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex > -1) {
                        foundNode = false;
                        child = graph[myStack[curStackPos].node][myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex];
                        unexploredNodeChild = -1;
                        if (sizeGraph[child] > 0) { // get number of adjacent nodes of the current child
                            for(k = 0;k < sizeGraph[child] && !foundNode;k++) {
                                if (exploredNode[graph[child][k]] == 0) {
                                    unexploredNodeChild = k;
                                    foundNode = true;
                                }
                            }
                        }
                        // push into the stack the child if not explored
                        myStack[curStackPos + 1].node = graph[myStack[curStackPos].node][myStack[curStackPos].curChildIndex];
                        myStack[curStackPos + 1].curChildIndex = unexploredNodeChild;
                        curStackPos++;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Yes, that's the problem while using recursive calls ! You must try to make it more like a loop instead of recursive call. –  ykatchou Aug 2 '12 at 12:22
1  
...or start off with a bigger stack. –  Paul R Aug 2 '12 at 12:25
3  
@Paul R : it's not solving the issue ! It's just a dirty hack ! "They're is a memory leak, ooh, add more memory..." –  ykatchou Aug 2 '12 at 12:35
1  
@ykatchou - What do you mean? If the problem is that the stack is too small, using a larger stack is an obvious option. –  Bo Persson Aug 2 '12 at 13:41
1  
Yes it would be an option but if next time, this algorithm runs for a even larger input, you can't ask for a stupidly large stack when there is a clean solution for any case. At least it's what i understand. –  dyesdyes Aug 2 '12 at 13:47
show 3 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Typically you shouldn't rely on too deep recursion. Different platforms handle this differently, but generally it is roughly like this:

max number of recursion = stack memory / function state

The stack memory variable is very different from system to system. Some OS may just use a fixed amount of main memory, others may allow a growing stack, some may use page files and swap memory for growing and put no limit at all. As a C programmer with the abstract C standard you cannot rely on anything.

So you could optimize the function state first (rid off variables, use smaller integers, etc.). But that might not be the real solution.

  • Some compilers recognize tail recursion and transform recursion into iteration. But again, this isn't something to rely on (the C Standard doesn't guarantee it; a language where you can rely on this would be Common LISP). See also Does C++ limit recursion depth? as a related question.

  • Compilers may offer options to set recursive limits. But once again, one shouldn't rely on it if your deepness is effectively unlimited by design.

But the real solution is to manually transform your recursion to iteration. The simplest way would be store all function-internal data in a stack and emulate your recursion by hand:

int fac(int x) {
    if (x<=1) return 1;
    return x*fac(x-1);
}

To (Pcode to get you the point):

int fac(int x_) {
    struct state_t { 
        int x;
        int ret;
    }; // <-- all parameters and local variables would go here in the beginning
    struct stack_of_state_t {...};
    stack_of_state_t stack;

    push(stack, {x_, 1});

    while (1) {
        if (top(stack).x<=1) return top(stack).ret;
        push(stack, {x-1, (top(stack).x) * top(stack).ret});            
    }
}

While this usually works better than recursion, this might not be the smartest solution and you should start to work out which state really has to be conserved.

In our example we find that we always only need the top of the stack, so we instantly rid the stack again:

int fac(int x) {    
    int ret = 1;
    while (1) {
        if (x<=1) return ret;
        ret = x * ret;
        x = x-1;
    }
}

And make it even more beautyful:

int fac(int x) {    
    int ret = 1;
    while (x>1)
        ret *= x--;
    return ret;
}

This one of the classic, non-recursive factorial implementations.

So in summary, the general recipe: Begin with putting your function's state into a stack, and then go on with refactoring.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the English word is factorial, not faculty, no? –  Jens Gustedt Aug 2 '12 at 14:09
    
@JensGustedt: Yeah right, in german faculty and factorial both are "Fakultät", hence my mistake. Thanks for pointing that out. –  phresnel Aug 2 '12 at 14:24
add comment

If the function is called once per node, you'll need 875000 stack frames with at least 7*sizeof(int*) bytes, each. On a 32bit system, that needs 23MB of stack which isn't much but probably outside the defined limits.

You will need to come up with an iterative approach to walk your graph. Basically, you need to allocate a large array (size == number of nodes) of structures where each structure contains the "stack frame". In your case, the stack frame is node and i because everything else is just passed around and doesn't change.

Whenever you need recursion, you save the current values of node and i in a new structure and append it to the array. When the recursion ends, restore the values.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can convert your recursive code to use a stack data structure that you allocate on heap yourself. This is more difficult and way less clean than straight recursion, but it is more robust as it is not limited by call stack size.

share|improve this answer
    
... but limited by heap size (whatever this is) instead. –  undur_gongor Aug 2 '12 at 12:44
    
@undur_gongor ... which equals the amount of available RAM. I wouldn't worry about that with 875000 nodes. –  Tibor Aug 2 '12 at 12:47
add comment

There is a maximum number of recursive calls because your computer has only a certain amount of memory (whether that is RAM or disk). Each call requires some memory to save the data of the function. So only a certain number of calls can fit in memory. Additional, operating systems and programming tools limit stack size. You may be able to increase that stack size to use more of available memory, but it remains finite.

Typically, graph algorithms for large graphs are implemented by augmenting the graph with additional information. For example, you could add a field to each node or each edge of the graph that indicates whether it has been visited in the current traversal, or you can add a field that specifies the length of the shortest path found so far to that node. Then you rewrite the algorithm as an iterative algorithm using that additional data instead of as a recursive algorithm using the stack. If you cannot augment the original graph directly, you can construct a separate graph with the additional data.

Of course, the additional data typically uses space proportional to the size of your graph. If your algorithm recurses less than that, such as to a depth of log(size of graph), then you might wish to find a solution that uses less space. As others have suggested, one way to do this is to allocate memory and implement your own analog of recursion by saving data in that memory as your algorithm proceeds through various depths of a traversal. This is theoretically equivalent to recursion, but it has two advantages in practice: Allocating memory may be easier than increasing permitted stack space, and it gives you direct control over how much data is stored for each level, whereas allowing the compiler to do recursion places the compiler in charge of storing the data (and the compiler may inefficiently store various temporary values from your function state that do not really need to be stored).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.