Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an total amount payable by an Employer this amount needs to be split amongst staff.

For example

a $100
b $200
c -$200
d -$200
e $500

The total amount payable is the sum of all items, in this case $400

The problem is I must call a 3rd party system to assign these amounts one by one. But I cannot let the balance go below $0 or above the total amount ($400) during the allocation.

So if I insert in the above order a,b,c will work so the current allocated sum = 100 + 200 - 200 = $100. However when I try to allocate d. The system will try to add -$200 which will make the current allocated sum -$100 which is < $0 which is not allowed so it will be rejected by the system.

If I sort the list so negative items are last. i.e.

a $100
b $200
e $500
c -$200
d -$200

a will work, b will work, but when it tries to insert e there will be insufficient funds error because we have exceeded the maximum of $400. I have come to the realisation that there is no silver bullet and there will always be scenarios what will break. However I wanted to come up with a solution that would work most of the time.

Normal sample of data would have between 5 - 100 items. With only 2-15% of those containing negative amounts.

Is there a clever way I can sort the list? Or would it be better just to try an allocated multiple times. For example split the positive and negatives into two list. Insert positives until one errors, then insert negatives until it errors then switch back and forth between the list until it is all allocated or until both of them error.

share|improve this question
4  
Won't this always fail on 'e' regardless of order? Adding $500 will ALWAYS take you over $400 unless the balance was negative beforehand (which you state is invalid) –  Steve Greatrex Aug 2 '12 at 12:54
    
@SteveGreatrex yes that is correct. But I would hope I could the maximum amount possible b4 failing –  Daveo Aug 2 '12 at 12:56
    
Do you want to achieve the maximum value or the maximum number of transactions? –  Steve Greatrex Aug 2 '12 at 13:00
    
maximum number of transactions so there is minimal amount of manual intervention required –  Daveo Aug 2 '12 at 13:06
1  
@Daveo would you be allowed to split the $500 into separate $400 + $100 transactions? Or are the transactions important? –  James Aug 2 '12 at 13:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although this effectively the same as Haile's answer (I started working on an answer before he posted his, and beat me to the punch) I thought I would post it anyway since it includes some source code and may help someone who wants a concrete implementation (sorry that it's not in C#, C++ is the closest thing I have access to at the moment)

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

vector<int> orderTransactions(const vector<int>& input) {

    int max = accumulate(input.begin(), input.end(), 0);

    vector<int> results;
    // if the sum is negative or zero there are no transactions that can be added
    if (max <= 0) {
        return results;
    }

    // split the input into positives and negatives
    vector<int> sorted = vector<int>(input);
    sort(sorted.begin(), sorted.end());

    vector<int> positives;
    vector<int> negatives;

    for (int i = 0; i < sorted.size(); i++) {
        if (sorted[i] >= 0) {
            positives.push_back(sorted[i]);
        } else {
            negatives.push_back(sorted[i]);
        }
    }   

    // try to process all the transactions
    int sum = 0;
    while (!positives.empty() || !negatives.empty()) {
        // find the largest positive transaction that can be added without exceeding the max
        bool positiveFound = false;

        for (int i = (int)positives.size()-1; i >= 0; i--) {
            int n = positives[i];
            if ((sum + n) <= max) {
                sum += n;
                results.push_back(n);
                positives.erase(positives.begin()+i);
                positiveFound = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (positiveFound == true) {
            continue;
        }

        // if there is no positive find the smallest negative transaction that keep the sum above 0
        bool negativeFound = false;
        for (int i = (int)negatives.size()-1; i >= 0; i--) {
            int n = negatives[i];
            if ((sum + n) >= 0) {
                sum += n;
                results.push_back(n);
                negatives.erase(negatives.begin()+i);
                negativeFound = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        // if there is neither then this as far as we can go without splitting the transactions
        if (!negativeFound) {
            return results;
        }
    }

    return results;
}


int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {

    vector<int> quantities;
    quantities.push_back(-304);
    quantities.push_back(-154);
    quantities.push_back(-491);
    quantities.push_back(-132);
    quantities.push_back(276);
    quantities.push_back(-393);
    quantities.push_back(136);
    quantities.push_back(172);
    quantities.push_back(589);
    quantities.push_back(-131);
    quantities.push_back(-331);
    quantities.push_back(-142);
    quantities.push_back(321);
    quantities.push_back(705);
    quantities.push_back(210);
    quantities.push_back(731);
    quantities.push_back(92);
    quantities.push_back(-90);

    vector<int> results = orderTransactions(quantities);

    if (results.size() != quantities.size()) {
        cout << "ERROR: Couldn't find a complete ordering for the transactions. This is as far as we got:" << endl;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < results.size(); i++) {
        cout << results[i] << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

What I think you want to do here is:

  1. Filter out any values that will always fail
  2. Order the transactions by smallest absolute value - smaller transactions means we can do more before we hit the limit
  3. Keep processing positives until the next one will cause us to go over the limit
  4. Keep processing negatives until we either run out of negatives or the next one would take us under $0
  5. Repeat 3-4

I've not tested the code below, but it should be vaguely the right shape:

var validValues = values
    .Where(v => Math.Abs(v) < upperLimit) //filter out anything that will always fail
    .OrderBy(v => Math.Abs(v)); //sort by the absolute value (to maximise # of transactions)

var additions              = validValues.Where(v => v >= 0);
var subtractionsEnumerator = validValues.Where(v => v < 0).GetEnumerator();
var currentTotal           = 0.0;

//go through all of the additions
foreach (var addition in additions)
{
    if (currentTotal + addition > upperLimit) //would the next addition take us over the limit?
    {
        //keep processing negative values until the next one would take us past $0
        while (subtractionsEnumerator.MoveNext() && currentTotal + subtractionsEnumerator.Current > 0)
        {
            currentTotal += subtractionsEnumerator.Current;
        }
    }

    if (currentTotal + addition > upperLimit) //if we weren't able to reduce by enough
        throw new Exception("Can't process transactions");

    currentTotal += addition;
}

//do we have any left over negatives?  better process those as well
while (subtractionsEnumerator.MoveNext())
{
    if (currentTotal + subtractionsEnumerator.Current < 0)
        throw new Exception("Can't process transactions");

    currentTotal += subtractionsEnumerator.Current;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is not optimal if you want to minimize the times we break the rules. For example: (200, 300, 300, -550) with limit = 600. Your algorithm will pick 200+300=500, then we pick -550 going under 0. If you instead chooose 300+300 = 600, then -550, then +200, you never go under 0 or over 600. –  Haile Aug 2 '12 at 13:26
    
Yeah, This looks good except that I'd deal with the largest absolutes first since as Haile has implied the larger ones are harder to fit in so you should do them sooner rather than later to avoid situations where you get stuck due to only having big ones. –  Chris Aug 2 '12 at 15:06

If you want to minimize the number of times you "break" the rules (go under 0$ or over max$) I think the following will do the trick:

  • Split the values between negative and positive

LOOP:

  • Choose a subset of the positive values such that the sum is maximized but still less than max, add those resources
  • Chose a subset of the negative values such that the sum of their absolute values is maximized but still less than your current balance, subtract those resources

Clearly at some point you will find that the subset you are searching for does not exist, so you'll have to break a rule to continue.

Please note that the greedy approach of sorting and picking the smaller values in order will not work when you choose the subsets.

EDIT: If you can split the transition this is even easier. Just keep looping. When you can't find the next subset, split the biggest value in pieces and continue searching.

share|improve this answer

I think this is a rather hard but interesting problem!

It won't be feasible to search every permutation as there are n! ways of ordering the list.

One approach might be to try to find the best fit of positive values that will not exceed the total limit. This problem is then similiar to the Knapsack problem. You could then look for the best fit of negatives that will not take you below zero, again using the same technique. Repeat until all values are added.

share|improve this answer

An algorithm you may try.

The implementation is dirty, many lists are allocated and the result is in reverse order. Of course it's really slow on big lists.

static List<int> GetDeepestPossibility(List<int> values, int sum = 0)
{
  List<int> deepest = new List<int>();
  for (int i = 0; i < values.Count; i++)
  {
    if (Allowed(values[i] + sum))
    {
      List<int> subValues = new List<int>(values);
      subValues.RemoveAt(i);
      List<int> possibility = GetDeepestPossibility(subValues, values[i] + sum);
      possibility.Add(values[i]);
      if (possibility.Count + 1 > deepest.Count)
      {
        possibility.Add(values[i]);
        deepest = possibility;
        if (deepest.Count == values.Count - 1)
          break;
      }
    }
  }
  return deepest;
}

private static bool Allowed(int p)
{
  return p >= 0 && p <= 600;
}

If you can split the transactions then take Tony's algorithm and split transaction when your are blocked.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.