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We want to overload placement new operator just to verify that used memory size is enough for the given class. We know this size. The construction is more or less in this way:

template <size_t MAXSIZE>
class PlacementNewTest {
public:
  void* operator new (size_t size, void* where)
  {
     if (size > MAXSIZE) {
        throw bad_alloc();
     }
     return where;
  }
};

Let say used in such simplified context:

char buffer[200];

class A : public PlacementNewTest<sizeof buffer> {
public:
   char a[100];  
};

class B : public A {
public:
   char b[200];  
};


int main() {
   A* a = new (buffer) A; // OK
   a->~A();
   B* b = new (buffer) B; // throwed bad_alloc
   b->~B();
}

During testing phase I have this PlacementNewTest<> class used, but in the release code I consider to remove it. Do you think, basing on your experience, how much this will cost our performance, not to remove this extra test class? Is this only cost of this verification if (size > MAXSIZE)? In other words, what is performance penalty for such redefinition:

class PlacementNewNOP {
public:
  void* operator new (size_t size, void* where)
  {
     return where;
  }
};

Maybe it is not important in this question - but: This is, and must be, C++03. We cannot upgrade to C++11. And boost is not an option too, just C++03.

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1  
While you're at it, you should check the alignment: assert(reinterpret_cast<uintptr_t>(where) % alignof(A) == 0) etc. –  Kerrek SB Aug 2 '12 at 13:13
    
@KerrekSB How the hell did I miss that :-/ I'm usually the alignment police :-D –  Let_Me_Be Aug 2 '12 at 13:13
    
"Premature optimization is the root of all evil (or at least most of it) in programming". Dont think of performance penalties until you face them. And when you face them, weigh possible improvement against the effort –  Roman Saveljev Aug 2 '12 at 13:14
    
@KerrekSB - can you explain why testing alignment is important in this very case? And, do you know replacement for allignof which is C++11 feature, I have to use g++3.x.x (C++03 std). –  PiotrNycz Aug 2 '12 at 13:31
    
@PiotrNycz Because the alignment requirements of char are less stringent than other types. Btw. alignof() should be also a gcc extensions (not sure when they added that, but it should be a looong time ago). –  Let_Me_Be Aug 2 '12 at 13:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There shouldn't be any overhead apart from the comparison, unless you are using virtual methods, the binding is static.

Of course there is the exception overhead, but since that is something that shouldn't happen, you should be safe to ignore it.

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Can you say why do you think so? I mean, can you explain how g++ compiler internally implements such placement new operator overloading? –  PiotrNycz Aug 2 '12 at 13:30
    
@PiotrNycz Because overloading is resolved during compilation, not during run-time. During run-time it will be a simple function call. Again, all methods (unless virtual) are statically bound. –  Let_Me_Be Aug 2 '12 at 13:32
    
So, it will be overhead of "simple function call" or no overhead in comparison to case without placement new operator overloading? –  PiotrNycz Aug 2 '12 at 13:58
    
@PiotrNycz You will have one call in both cases. –  Let_Me_Be Aug 2 '12 at 17:29

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