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What is the correct code to cast an object back to a generic list like so?

Type x = typeof(MyClass);
object o = new List<MyClass>();

List<x> l = o as List<x>; // Not working

EDIT: Maybe it wasn't all clear: The object is a list of a generic type which i don't know at compile time.. nevertheless List has functions like "Add" i can call anyway, like:

l.Add((new MyClass() as object)) as x);
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Is there a reason why you are using List<x> instead of List<MyClass> on the last line? Is the requirement to cast the list to a generic list given a Type object? –  James Michael Hare Aug 2 '12 at 13:40
1  
In short, you can't use this kind of syntax. Perhaps you could explain why you need this, and someone could suggest a better alternative? –  Dan Puzey Aug 2 '12 at 13:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
List<MyClass> l = (List<MyClass>)o;

or

List<MyClass> l = o as List<MyClass>;

Do you mean

List<> l = o as List<>;

This is not possible until you use a generic class:

class C<T>
{
    public List<T> List = new List<T>();
}

Usage:

C<MyClass> c = new C<MyClass>();
c.List.Add(new MyClass());

Finally I got OP's goal:

Type listType = typeof(List<>);
Type targetType = listType.MakeGenericType(typeof(YourClass));
List<YourClass> list = (List<YourClass>)Activator.CreateInstance(targetType);

See MSDN for details.

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sorry, maybe the question is misleading.. i'll edit it –  David Aug 2 '12 at 13:40
    
Thx. But how can I use "var c = new C<typeFromRuntime>();"? –  David Aug 2 '12 at 13:48
    
@David: See my updated answer. –  abatishchev Aug 2 '12 at 13:54
    
Thx :) But i don't want a new instance of my type but rather use the type to cast object o to List<>, so i can call Add on it –  David Aug 2 '12 at 14:02
    
@David: so you wan to to cast programmatically to type known only in runtime? –  abatishchev Aug 2 '12 at 15:07

When the generic interface is not usable because you don't know the type arguments at compile time, but a non-generic interface is available, you can use that instead:

Type x = typeof(MyClass);
object o = new List<MyClass>();

IList l = (IList)o;
l.Add(new MyClass());

The non-generic IList interface is implemented by the generic List<T> class.

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object testobject = new List<string>();
List<string> list = (List<string>)testobject;
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this is incorrect due question clarification by op –  abatishchev Aug 2 '12 at 15:09
    
You downvote answers because the poster changed the question after I posted my answer...? –  Jan Aug 2 '12 at 15:15
        List<Employee> employees = new List<Employee> { new Employee { Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString(), Name = "SOME" }, new Employee { Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString(), Name = "SOME2" } };

        object obj = employees;

        List<Employee> unBoxed = (List<Employee>)obj;
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this is incorrect due question clarification by op –  abatishchev Aug 2 '12 at 15:09

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