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I have 2 .cs files each with a class in it. How do I call a method in a class from Form1.cs in another class inside of Form2.cs?

Looks something like this...

Form1.cs

public partial class Class1 : ClassContainer
{
    public void awesomeMethod()
        {
        }
}

Form2.cs

class Class2 : SomethingChanged
{
    public void decentMethod()
    {
    }
}

I would like to call awesomeMethod() inside of the decentMethod(). Thanks.

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Please share why this was down voted –  Garrett Aug 2 '12 at 13:47
    
Your question is not clear. Just make a reference to Class1 within Class2. Of course if the Class1 is actually a Form you don't really want to do this. –  Ramhound Aug 2 '12 at 15:19
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5 Answers

In order to call an instance method of a class, you need an instance of a class. Thus, to call Class1's awesomeMethod, you must create an instance of Class1:

Class1 c = new Class1();
c.awesomeMethod();

From your opening paragraph, though, it sounds like the two actual classes are two different forms. In that case, it doesn't really make sense for one form to create a new instance of another form purely to get at what is presumably a helper method - creating that second form is potentially an awful lot of overhead. You'd be better off putting helper methods into a separate, more lightweight class.

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You mean, like this?

public void decentMethod()
{
    Class1 instance = new Class1();
    instance.awesomeMethod();
}

You need an instance of the class you want to call the method on.


Or, if you don't need/want to work with an instance, make it the method static:

public partial class Class1 : ClassContainer
{
    public static void awesomeMethod()
    {
    }
}

...

public void decentMethod()
{
    Class1.awesomeMethod();
}
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tried that, says does not contain constructor that takes 0 arguments. I feel that im missing something simple but it has been a rough week. –  Garrett Aug 2 '12 at 13:42
    
So, how does the constructors look like? –  Dominic Kexel Aug 2 '12 at 13:43
    
Thanks, ill just do static void. I am cleaning up someone elses 3k line code and i missed a few things - ill accept when the time limit is up –  Garrett Aug 2 '12 at 13:46
1  
Your first paragraph suggests that the two classes you're actually dealing with are forms - in which case, the method you're trying to call is in the wrong place. It doesn't make sense for a helper method that's used by multiple forms to live in one particular form; it would be better to move that method to a completely separate helper class. –  Chris Aug 2 '12 at 13:48
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I'm guessing that these aren't real method signatures.

Does awesomeMethod need any references to any of the members of decentMethod?

If not, it would be as simple as:

new Class1().awesomeMethod();
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If you just want to call the method you can use anonymous object.

class Class2 : SomethingChanged
{
    public void decentMethod()
    {
         new Class1().awesomeMethod();
    }
}

If your class Class1 is inner class / nested class of Form1

class Class2 : SomethingChanged
{
    public void decentMethod()
    {
         new Form1.Class1().awesomeMethod();
    }
}
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Here is something you can try in Visual Studio. Write your use of the method without the definition. For example, somewhere in your code, type:

cls_a instance_a;

Then you get a squiggly line under cls_a. Right click "cls_a" and select generate from the popup menu. Then see what happens.

I saw App_Code directory created, and the class cls_a was generated in a file cls_a.cs in that directory. Visual Studio generated the definition. And it compiles.

You can then type the use of a method without the definition from cls_a like this:

instance_a.meth_x();

Again, right-click on the squiggly line and select generate. Let Visual Studio generate the definition for you.

I think ASP .NET requires you to put your additional classes in the App_Code subdirectory. And if you need to bend ASP.NET to your way, I think the Web.config file can be edited so you can put your code files wherever you want. I have not reviewed how to do this so I leave that to you or someone else.

Anyway, not having your classes and methods in App_Code subdirectory can cause your classes and functions to not be seen in your web form code, even though everything else is correct.

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