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I'm trying to create a compile-time bit mask using metaprograming techniques, my idea is to create something like this:

unsigned int Mask3 = Mask<2>(); // value = 0x03 = b00000000000000000000000000000011
unsigned int Mask3 = Mask<3>(); // value = 0x07 = b00000000000000000000000000000111
unsigned int Mask3 = Mask<7>(); // value = 0x7F = b00000000000000000000000001111111

The code that I'm trying is this:

template <const unsigned int N> const unsigned int Mask()
{
    if (N <= 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return ((1 << N) | Mask<N - 1>());
    }
}

return 1;

But it result in tons pairs of warnings:

  • warning C4554: '<<' : check operator precedence for possible error
  • warning C4293: '<<' : shift count negative or too big

And in the end, the compile error:

  • error C1202: recursive type or function dependency context too complex.

So, I deduce that the recursivity never ends and falls into a compiler infinite loop but I'm don't understanding WHY.

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Why wouldn't you do something like "int result = 0; for(i=0; i<N; i++){ result = result << 1; result += 1; } return result; ? –  SinisterMJ Aug 2 '12 at 13:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As has already been pointed out, you're depending on a runtime check to stop a compile time recursion, which can't work. More importantly, perhaps, for what you want to do, is that you're defining a function, which has no value until you call it. So even after you stop the recursion with a specialization, you still have a nested sequence of functions, which will be called at runtime.

If you want full compile time evaluation, you must define a static data member of a class template, since that's the only way a compile time constant can appear in a template. Something like:

template <unsigned int N>
struct Mask
{
    static unsigned int const value = (1 << (N - 1)) | Mask<N - 1>::value;
};

template <>
struct Mask<0>
{
    static unsigned int const value = 0;
};

(I've also corrected the numerical values you got wrong.)

Of course, you don't need anything this complicated. The following should do the trick:

template <unsigned int N>
struct Mask
{
    static unsigned int const value = (1 << (N + 1)) - 1;
};

template <>
struct Mask<0>
{
    static unsigned int const value = 0;
};

(You still need the specialization for 0. Otherwise, 0 means all bits set.)

Finally, of course: to access the value, you need to write something like Mask<3>::value. (You might want to wrap this in a macro.)

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Mark this as accepted answer only because explains fair and clear how to do in the temeplate form, but the best answer is the one fo Sander De Dycker. –  PaperBirdMaster Aug 2 '12 at 15:02
2  
Except that the one from Sander De Dycker still involves a function call, so the value isn't a constant. (With C++11, however, it could be declared constexpr.) And it fails for N == 0. (Otherwise, it corresponds to my second solution, above.) –  James Kanze Aug 2 '12 at 15:14
    
If N >= 32, my compiler complains that it is not standards compliant, even if I made it unsigned long long. Command: clang++-3.3 -Wall -Werror -std=c++11 -pedantic Mask.cpp (The flags standard for strictly C++11). Result: Mask.cpp:7:48: error: in-class initializer for static data member is not a constant expression; folding it to a constant is a GNU extension [-Werror,-Wgnu] static unsigned long long const value = (1 << (N + 1)) - 1; Mask.cpp:19:10: note: in instantiation of template class 'Mask<32>' requested here cout << Mask<32>::value << endl; –  Siu Ching Pong -Asuka Kenji- Mar 5 at 9:56
    
@AsukaKenji-SiuChingPong- I wonder what exactly it is complaining about. The expression certainly meets the requirements for an integral constant expression in C++03, and is widely used as such. N is const, as is 1, and all of the operators used are allowed in const expressions. –  James Kanze Mar 5 at 12:30
    
Yes, I also wonder. I think a possible reason is that the compiler doesn't do << out of 32-bit range during compilation (I have no idea if this is standard behaviour or not). Try this too with your compiler (turn on all warnings and standards complaint): static std::int64_t const my_min = -9223372036854775808LL;. Mine (clang++-3.3) complains with min.cpp:5:37: error: integer constant is so large that it is unsigned [-Werror]. If I change it to -9223372036854775808ULL (Notice the 'U' added), there's no error. I think it's related to the intermediate values during compilation. –  Siu Ching Pong -Asuka Kenji- Mar 5 at 18:56

It doesn't need to be recursive. This should work just fine :

template <const unsigned int N> const unsigned int Mask()
{
    return ((1 << N) - 1);
}

It doesn't even need to be a template really. An (inlined) function is ok.

Note that if you want to support any value of N, specifically N >= sizeof(unsigned int) * CHAR_BIT, you probably want to treat those as a special case.

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A template is created at compile time, but you are relying on run time behavior to stop the recursion.

For example, if you instantiate Mask<2>, it is going to use Mask<1>, which is going to use Mask<0>, which is going to use Mask<-1>, etc.

You have a runtime check for N being <= 1, but this doesn't help when it's compiling. It still creates an infinite sequence of functions.

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To blunt template instantiation recursion you need to introduce one explicit specialization:

template <0> const unsigned int Mask()
{
    return 1;
}

Your recursion never ends, because compiler tries to generate template implementation for both if-branches. So, when it generates Mask<0> it also generates Mask<0xffffffff> and so on

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C++11 -- no recursion or templates:

constexpr unsigned mask(unsigned N) { return unsigned(~(-1<<N)); }
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