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I have a problem with the package NLME using the following code:

library(nlme)
x <- rnorm(100)
z <- rep(c("a","b"),each=50)
y <- rnorm(100)
test.data <- data.frame(x,y,z)
test.fun <- function(test.dat)
{
    form <- as.formula("y~x")   
    ran.form <- as.formula("~1|z")
    modell <- lme(fixed = form, random=ran.form, data=test.dat)
    pseudo.newdata <- test.dat[1,]
    predict(modell, newdata= pseudo.newdata) ###THIS CAUSES THE ERROR!
}

test.fun(test.data)

The predict causes an error and I already found what basically causes it.

The modell object saves how it was called and predict seems to use that to make prediction but is unable to find the formula objects form and ran.form becauses it does not look for them in the right namespace. In fact, I can avoid the problem by doing this:

 attach(environment(form), warn.conflicts = FALSE)
 predict(modell, newdata= pseudo.newdata) 
 detach()

My long term goal however is to save the modell to disk and use them later. I suppose I could try saving the formula objects as well, but this strikes me as a very annoying and cumbersome way to deal with the problem.

I work with automatically generated formula objects instead of writing them down explicitly because I create many models with different definitions in a sort of batch process so I can not avoid them. So my ideal solution would be a way to create the lme object so that I can forget about the formula object afterwards and predict "just works". Thanks for any help.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try replacing lme(arg1, arg2, arg3) with do.call(lme, list(arg1, arg2, arg3)).

library(nlme)
x <- rnorm(100)
z <- rep(c("a","b"),each=50)
y <- rnorm(100)
test.data <- data.frame(x,y,z)
test.fun <- function(test.dat)
{
    form <- as.formula("y~x")   
    ran.form <- as.formula("~1|z")
    ## JUST NEED TO CHANGE THE FOLLOWING LINE
    ## modell <- lme(fixed = form, random=ran.form, data=test.dat)
    modell <- do.call(lme, list(fixed=form, random=ran.form, data=test.data))
    pseudo.newdata <- test.dat[1,]
    predict(modell, newdata= pseudo.newdata) ###THIS CAUSES THE ERROR!
}

test.fun(test.data)
#          a 
# 0.07547742 
# attr(,"label")
# [1] "Predicted values"

This works because do.call() evaluates its argument list in the calling frame, before evaluating the call to lme() that it constructs. To see why that helps, type debug(predict), and then run your code and mine, comparing the debugging messages printed when you are popped into the browser.

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1  
+1 Nice use of do.call –  Andrie Aug 2 '12 at 15:01
    
Brian Ripley taught me a similar trick in 2003, using eval. Since I have been using it so often, we have named it "Ripley's game". finzi.psych.upenn.edu/R/Rhelp02a/archive/16599.html –  Dieter Menne Aug 2 '12 at 15:22
1  
+1 this is much better than I had started to hack around with, which was something like modell <- lapply(modell$call,eval.parent) (ugh). It's too bad this stuff is necessary, though ... some of the design of the modeling framework is (unnecessarily??) fragile ... –  Ben Bolker Aug 2 '12 at 16:15
1  
@BenBolker -- Love your "(unnecessarily??)" with the two "??" -- you pretty exactly capture my own feeling about the issue as well. I think this passage (from Thomas Lumley's interesting Standard nonstandard evaluation rules.pdf) points to one major source of the fragility: "Many modelling and graphical functions have a formula argument and a data argument. If variables in the formula were required to be in the data argument life would be a lot simpler, but this requirement was not made when formulas were introduced." –  Josh O'Brien Aug 2 '12 at 16:31
1  
Ok, I tested this and it works great. Many thanks. Another comment on the modeling framework, I don't have the same problem with lm. So it does not seem like a "necessary" problem due to design flaws of the language. –  Erik Aug 2 '12 at 18:20

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