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I am returning an integer list from a datacolumn. This particular column is (int,null). But I got an exception.

Specified cast is not valid.

Code:

public List <int> GetSortOrder(DataTable dt,string columnName)
{
    List<int> Orders = new List<int>();
    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
    {
        Orders.Add((int)row[columnName]);
    }
    return Orders;
}

What I want is if it is null, then forcing it as 0. Should I use nullable type int? or just simply using if ... else...?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The column actually stores DBNull.Value instead of usual C# null. That's why operator ?? is not working. To check if the column is null use row.IsNull method:

Orders.Add(row.IsNull(columnName) ? 0 : (int)row[columnName]);

Operator ?? doesn't work with DBNulls.

You may also want to check this link: Handle DBNull in C# for some efficient examples of converting DBNull-able int to int?

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        Orders.Add((int)(row[columnName] ?? 0));
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+1 for that, I never heared about ?? –  Shai Aug 2 '12 at 13:57
1  
it's called the 'null coalescing operator' –  paul Aug 2 '12 at 13:58
    
yeah I just read about it :D –  Shai Aug 2 '12 at 13:58
    
If I use .Net 3.5, can I use ?? –  Love Aug 2 '12 at 13:59
1  
@Love: Yes, you can. You could use it against .NET 2, as well.. –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '12 at 14:00

I'd suggest int?:

Orders.Add(((int?)row[columnName]).GetValueOrDefault());

In my opinion, it keeps the intent and code clear and concise, which an if/else doesn't do quite as well. Using ?? 0 as the other answers have suggested is also good.

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The intent of the code is to return an integer that is defaulted to 0, according to the original question. I don't see how allowing a null value in the list improves clariry or intent - it would seem to contradict both. –  Dan Puzey Aug 2 '12 at 14:29

That should work:

public List <int> GetSortOrder(DataTable dt,string columnName)
{
    List<int> Orders = new List<int>();
    int? nullableInt;
    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
    {
        nullableInt = (int)row[columnName];
        Orders.Add(nullableInt??0);
    }
    return Orders;
}
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No, you'll still get an error when you try to cast a null value to int. You need to cast to int?. –  Dan Puzey Aug 2 '12 at 14:32
    
I wasn't sure as I didn't actually try it with real data. But it does compile like that... –  Jan Aug 2 '12 at 14:39
    
Of course it compiles, because row[columnName] is of type object. The exception is thrown at runtime. By the way both (int)row[columnName] and (int?)row[columnName] throw an exception when row[columnName] is DBNull.Value. –  Artemix Aug 2 '12 at 19:31

I would also use an int? I like the Field method:

int? myInt = row.Field<int?>(columnName);
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+1 Thanks for sharing! Very useful one! –  Artemix Aug 2 '12 at 19:38

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