Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a single PopupMenu item where the TMenuItem tag changes according to which button calls it. Each button has its own TEdit (ResultTFile1, ResultTFile2 and ResultTFile3). These TEdits are created with the Form Designer.

var
 TempResultFile : TEdit;
begin
 // Find the right TEdit
 case (Sender as TMenuItem).Tag of
  1: TempResultFile := ResultTFile1;
  2: TempResultFile := ResultTFile2;
  3: TempResultFile := ResultTFile3;
 end;

 // Call save function
 if (SaveDialog1.Execute) then TempResultFile.Text := SaveDialog1.FileName;
end;

However, it doesn't work. The Dialog opens, but after execution, the FileName variable is not given to the real TEdit.Text (ResultTFile1, ResultTFile2 and ResultTFile3). There's no error. There's just nothing. The debugger doesn't seem to react -- but then, I could be wrong. If I understand this well, it's because the value is given to TempResultFile and not the real TEdit. How can I code it in a way where TempResultFile points to the component?

share|improve this question
    
You have not provided enough information. Show where ResultTFile1 etc. are declared. And tell us what "it doesn't work means". That's never enough info. Complete error message and point in code where error is raised are required. –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 14:06
    
OK, there's no error, there's just nothing. Does the file dialog show? What happens when you run the code under the debugger? What path is taken? –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 14:11
3  
TempResultFile does point to the component. An object reference is just that, a reference. Split the if/then statement onto two lines so that you can check whether or not SaveDialog1.Execute is returning True or False. Do that under the debugger. –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 14:14
3  
Some debugging logic: When the dialog appears (thus the routine runs) and no edit is filled, then, given the above code, the only conclusion that can be made is that SaveDialog1.FileName is empty or that SaveDialog1.Execute returns False. Otherwise TempResultFile shouldn't point to any edit which would result in an access violation. –  NGLN Aug 2 '12 at 18:34
2  
@Arioch'The: There's no reason to enable debug DCUs here. Simply stepping through the code as-is in the debugger would show the problem; stepping into the VCL/RTL is totally unnecessary. –  Ken White Aug 2 '12 at 20:54
show 4 more comments

4 Answers

As others have stated, there are only so many things that can go wrong with the code you have shown:

1) the TMenuItem.Tag may contain the wrong value.

2) TempResultFile may not be assigned a valid TEdit pointer. Despite what others have said, leaving the variable uninitialized DOES NOT guarantee that an Access Violation will occur, though it is likely. There is also the possibility that if the TEdit was not created correctly, or has been freed, that the pointer being assigned may be nil. That will cause an AV if you try to use it.

3) SaveDialog1.Execute() may be returning False. That happens if you cancel the dialog, but it can also happen if the dialog has an internal error. In some situations, you can use CommDlgExtendedError() to check for that condition.

4) SaveDialog1.FileName is empty, which should not happen if SaveDialog1.Execute() returns true, however it can happen if you are using a fairly modern Delphi version, running your app on Windows Vista or later, and select a non-filesystem file.

During your debugging, make sure you are checking for all those conditions, eg:

var         
  Item: TMenuItem;
  TempResultFile : TEdit;         
  S: String;
begin         
  Item := Sender as TMenuItem;

  case Item.Tag of         
    1: TempResultFile := ResultTFile1;         
    2: TempResultFile := ResultTFile2;         
    3: TempResultFile := ResultTFile3;         
  else
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('%s.Tag (%d) is not an expected value!', [Item.Name, Item.Tag]);
  end;         

  if TempResultFile = nil then
    raise Exception.Create('TempResultFile is nil!');

  if not SaveDialog1.Execute then
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('SaveDialog1.Execute returned false! Possible CommDlg error? (%d)', [CommDlgExtendedError()]);

  S := SaveDialog1.FileName;
  if S = '' then
    raise Exception.Create('SaveDialog1.FileName is empty!');

  TempResultFile.Text := S;
end;   

As an alternative to using the TMenuItem.Tag, the TPopupMenu.PopupComponent property will tell you which Button displayed the PopupMenu. You can set the TButton.Tag property to point at the TEdit component that corresponds to that Button, then you don't have to use the TMenuItem.Tag property anymore to hunt for the TEdit component, eg:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  ResultTButton1.Tag := NativeInt(ResultTFile1);
  ResultTButton2.Tag := NativeInt(ResultTFile2);
  ResultTButton3.Tag := NativeInt(ResultTFile3);
end;

procedure TForm1.MenuItemClick(Sender: TObject);
var 
  ResultTButton : TButton; 
  TempResultFile : TEdit; 
begin 
  ResultTButton := PopupMenu.PopupComponent as TButton; 
  TempResultFile := TEdit(ResultTButton.Tag); 
  if TempResultFile <> nil then begin
    if SaveDialog1.Execute then
      TempResultFile.Text := SaveDialog1.FileName; 
  end;
end; 
share|improve this answer
    
-1 This also doesn't explain what the problem is with the code in the Q –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 20:17
2  
Clearly you don't like VanillaH's question, but please stop downvoting everyone's answers for it! You are pissing everyone off now. This is not acceptable behavior for this site. –  Remy Lebeau Aug 2 '12 at 22:57
    
My code may not provide a solution to the original problem, but it is a viable alternative that does not require the event handler to be hard-coded for the possible TEdit controls it can look at. –  Remy Lebeau Aug 2 '12 at 22:59
    
"My code may not provide a solution to the original problem" That is my point. I agree that your use of PopupComponent is nicer than the approach in the Q. But answers are meant to answer the question. This does not, as you yourself have stated. Sorry, but if that's not worth a downvote, what is? Rather than being pissed off, you should remedy your answer. –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 23:15
    
@David, maybe since everyone is disagreeing with you, you should step back and look at the ridiculous stance you're taking here. We get it-the text of the question doesn't meet your approval. That doesn't make attempts to help the asker automatically wrong. You're not only providing a negative impression to a new user here, you're being snarky to everyone actually trying to help with a solution. Perhaps you should review your attitude instead. (I disagree with Remy's answer because the poster is obviously new to Delphi and I think this solution is a little advanced, but no downvote.) –  Ken White Aug 2 '12 at 23:30
show 14 more comments

In order to debug your code and work out what the problem is, change your code entirely – the comments explain how each works to help you solve the problem.

var
  TempResultFile : TEdit;
begin
  if SaveDialog1.Execute then    // Only try assignment if file chosen
  begin
    // Find the right TEdit
    // The default branch will be used if the wrong menu item is 
    // connected to the event, or you forgot to set the tag value
    case (Sender as TMenuItem).Tag of
      1: TempResultFile := ResultTFile1;
      2: TempResultFile := ResultTFile2;
      3: TempResultFile := ResultTFile3;
    else                     // If none of the above match
      raise Exception.CreateFmt('Invalid tag %d in %s', 
         [TMenuItem(Sender).Tag, TMenuItem(Sender).Name]));
    end;
    // At this point, we know TempResultFile has been assigned a value
    TempFileResult.Text := SaveDialog1.FileName;
  end
  else // User clicked cancel on SaveDialog1.
    ShowMessage('SaveDialog1.Execute returned False`);
end;

This does several things that will help you:

  • If the SaveDialog doesn't appear, you know you didn't assign the OnClick handler for a menu item.

  • If the user chooses Cancel on the SaveDialog, it returns false, and this will show you a dialog to indicate that fact (to eliminate that problem).

  • If the user chooses a file, it checks to make sure that a valid Tag assignment was made for the TMenuItem, and raises an exception if you forgot (and gives you the invalid tag value and the name of the component that was clicked).

In addition, it's safer code than what's in your original question, which can cause an access violation if the tag is not one of the values in your case statement and the SaveDialog1.Execute returns true. (There may be nothing assigned to TempResultFile when you access it's Text property.)

Once you've figured out what you're doing wrong, you can remove the final

end
else 
  ShowMessage('SaveDialog1.Execute returned False`);
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for the same reason as the others –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 21:20
2  
@David, this is entirely different code, and will identify the problem the poster is having with his own code. It's better than posting comments about a poor quality question and downvoting valid attempts to provide a solution. You've posted answers to literally dozens of questions of lower quality than this one, and collected tens of thousands of rep points doing so. –  Ken White Aug 2 '12 at 21:24
    
No, the code is to all intents and purposes just the same as in the Q. If the TEdit local was not being assigned to then there'd be an AV. If Execute was returning False then the user has clicked Cancel on the dialog. The question makes no sense. It's not a real question. Adding lots of spurious answers doesn't help. –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 21:32
    
@David: First, this code isn't the same. It only tries to read the tag and make the assignment if SaveDialog.Execute returns true, and notifies the user if it returns false; that helps identify the problem as an issue with the last line (orig. code) not being executed. If the return is true, it handles the case of a different menu item or forgetting a Tag assignment (the exception). Third, it prevents any AV by making sure that the assignment to TempFileResult actually was made (with the default in the case statement). It's totally different. That's OK. Knock yourself out. –  Ken White Aug 2 '12 at 21:38
1  
Which means in the original code, if SaveDialog returns false the assignment could have not been made and the user wouldn't know, which is exactly what I've pointed out twice to you now. Whatever. There are obviously issues with the question - David didn't approve it's content, and therefore all attempts to help must be punished until the poster complies. You don't like the question, downvote it instead of punishing people trying to be helpful. –  Ken White Aug 2 '12 at 21:57
show 6 more comments

You can write it like this:

begin
  if (SaveDialog1.Execute) then 
  begin
    case (Sender as TMenuItem).Tag of    
       1: ResultTFile1.text := SaveDialog1.FileName;    
       2: ResultTFile2.text := SaveDialog1.FileName;    
       3: ResultTFile3.text := SaveDialog1.FileName;   
    end;  
  end; 
end;
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 This is equivalent to the code in the question. This question cannot be answered at the moment. –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 16:16
add comment

Well...there's really only one reason why your code doesn't work: TempResultFile is not being assigned, meaning the "case" statement is failing to find a match. Either:

  • Sender is not an instance of TMenuItem
  • Sender is not the instance of TMenuItem you're expecting
  • Sender is your TMenuItem but you're not properly assigning the tag

Each case is super-easy to verify. Get to work!

Oh, as an aside, proper defensive style would re-write that code as:

var
 TempResultFile : TEdit;
begin
 {$IFDEF DEBUG}
 // preconditions
 Assert(sender is TMenuItem) ;
 {$ENDIF}
 // Find the right TEdit
 case (Sender as TMenuItem).Tag of
     1: TempResultFile := ResultTFile1;
     2: TempResultFile := ResultTFile2;
     3: TempResultFile := ResultTFile3;
     else Assert(false,'Failed to locate the proper TEdit') ;
 end;

 // Call save function
 if (SaveDialog1.Execute) then 
     TempResultFile.Text := SaveDialog1.FileName;

end;

share|improve this answer
1  
(1) (Sender as TMenuItem) would raise an AV, (2) The dialog wouldn't open, (3), Accessing Text of non-instantiated TempResultFile would raise an AV. –  Sertac Akyuz Aug 2 '12 at 22:05
1  
-1 for the reasons sertac lists. This Q is costing me oodles of rep! –  David Heffernan Aug 2 '12 at 22:17
    
Sertac/David: OK, fine, whatever. HTH do you know an AV isn't being raised when a NIL TempResultFile is assigned? Psychic debugging powers? Because the original question didn't indicate whether an external global exception handler is in place, whether the IDE is set to break on all exceptions or just unhandled exceptions, etc. I'm with Ken -- it's ridiculous to downvote attempts to help with this badly-put request. And David: you're right, this Q is costing you oodles of rep, 'cause I've definitely lost respect for you over how you've handled this particular question. –  Erik Knowles Aug 3 '12 at 19:17
    
It's a shame you reacted that way. I didn't rate your answer and downvoted. That's how it's meant to work. If question's are badly-put then the best response is to ask for clarification. It it doesn't come then vote to close. Again, that's how SO is designed to work. –  David Heffernan Aug 3 '12 at 20:43
1  
> ".. an AV isn't being raised when a NIL TempResultFile .." > And how is that relevant? –  Sertac Akyuz Aug 3 '12 at 23:16
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.