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So I have this project extending an existing codebase, and it's built on a MySQL database. I have a table whose tuples represent locations in a building, and I'm making a table representing edges connecting these locations in a graph for pathfinding. It's just a simple two-column table, each column holding an ID which is a foreign key referencing the locations table. So to summarize, the situation is like this:

CREATE TABLE node (
    ID int(10) AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL,
    (...)
    PRIMARY KEY(ID)
);

CREATE TABLE edge(
    ID_1 int(10),
    ID_2 int(10),
    FOREIGN KEY (ID_1) REFERENCES node(ID),
    FOREIGN KEY (ID_2) REFERENCES node(ID)
);

It's an existing assumption that the graph is symmetric, i.e. if node A has an edge to node B, node B must have an edge to node A. The case of one-way doors is being ignored here but doesn't seem applicable to my domain. As such, given nodes A and B are connected, their connection could be stored in the edge table in any of three ways:

{(A,B)}
{(B,A)}
{(A,B),(B,A)}

The question I use this table to answer is "Given this node, what nodes are its neighbours?" and presently my application does that using a query like this:

SELECT * FROM node
WHERE ID IN(
    SELECT ID_2
    FROM edge
    WHERE ID_1=?
    UNION
    SELECT ID_1
    FROM edge
    WHERE ID_2=?
);

However, my instinct was to use a CHECK constraint to ensure only the latter structure could be stored, which MySQL apparently doesn't support. From that answer, to emulate such a constraint I'd have to write triggers for every operation that keep every edge stored in both orderings. The advantage would be that it performs more as you'd naturally expect, and can answer the question with just

SELECT * FROM node
WHERE ID IN(
    SELECT ID_2
    FROM edge
    WHERE ID_1=?
);

Once I read about triggers to emulate CHECKs I talked it over with a friend and he suggested that ensuring reflexive storage would be wasteful (doubling storage use) and it should be left to the application to treat the database correctly. Now I'm a little unsure what's actually the best solution - should the database ensure reflexivity by doubling inserts and deletes using triggers, or should the application just keep reading data not stored reflexively so that it looks like it is? Allowing my database to represent the same data in multiple ways worries me just a bit. Is that unreasonable? Does the UNION and such amount to any appreciable performance hit?

(Being aimed at reasonably small sites, this system is unlikely to get past tens of thousands of nodes, with typical nodes having at most 6 edges).

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actually in your case it may be as well to consider each connection as one (you've then got the ability to block when needed!). What if there are multiple connections between rooms? like a room with 2 separate doors into the same lobby?

anyhoo those are all nice bits to play with...

Personally I would store each connection based on direction so if there is one 2 way door between a and b I would store like so

tbl_connections

current_room_id edge      connecting_room_id
1               north     2
2               south     1
1               east      3
1               west      4
4               east      1
1               south     5

yes I would include which edge is the connection if you have that data available - it will probably help later when they decide to include it.... (You can go from 1 to 3 but not 3 to one in the above structure).

storing like so you can then simply get a rooms neighbours (and direction) using:

SELECT connecting_room, edge
FROM tbl_connections
WHERE current_room_id = 1;

this should give you:

2, north
3, east
4, west
5, south

you could also map paths based on which room you are in and which edge you intend to go through with this schema.

Storing reflexive data as you call it is a pretty common solution and in this instance I think its the right way to go.

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Ok then, I guess storing in both directions it is. Don't know about storing the direction though, since one of the locations possible is an elevator landing, which would connect to every other landing of that elevator. –  user1571406 Aug 3 '12 at 9:53
    
hey 3d!!! adding levels the elevator could become several rooms (on for each level) that connect to each other by ceiling and floor as edges! - I like the sound of your project - holla at me on twitter (@cheeryfella) if you want a little helper (I'm not going to get involved but would love to have a look round) –  Ian Wood Aug 3 '12 at 11:19
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