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I am trying to create a special relationship between two existing models, User and Dwelling. A Dwelling has only one owner (Dwelling belongs_to :user, User has_one :dwelling) at the time of creation. But other Users can be added to this Dwelling as Roomies (there is no model created for this now, Roomie is a conceptual relationship).

I don't think I need a separate model but rather a special relationship with the existing models, but I could be wrong. I think the reference needs to be made with user_id from the Users table. I'm not really sure where to start this. Thank you for any and all help!

For example:

Dwelling1 
  user_id: 1 
  roomies: [1, 2, 3, 4]

Where 1, 2, 3, 4 are user_ids.

Updated Models

Dwelling Model

# dwelling.rb
class Dwelling < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :street_address, :city, :state, :zip, :nickname

    belongs_to :owner, :class_name => "User", :foreign_key => "owner_id"
    has_many :roomies, :class_name => "User"

    validates :street_address, presence: true
    validates :city, presence: true
    validates :state, presence: true
    validates :zip, presence: true

end

User Model

# user.rb
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :email, :first_name, :last_name, :password, :password_confirmation, :zip
  has_secure_password

  before_save { |user| user.email = email.downcase }
  before_save :create_remember_token

  belongs_to :dwelling
  has_many :properties, :class_name => "Dwelling", :foreign_key => "owner_id"

  validates :first_name, presence: true, length: { maximum: 50 }
  ...

Updated Dwelling Create Action

#dwellings_controller.rb
...
def create
@dwelling = current_user.properties.build(params[:dwelling])

  if @dwelling.save
    current_user.dwelling = @dwelling
    if current_user.save
      flash[:success] = "Woohoo! Your dwelling has been created. Welcome home!"
      redirect_to current_user
    else
      render 'new'
    end
  end
end
...
share|improve this question
    
Thank you very much, @MurifoX, for cleaning up my question format! –  justinraczak Aug 2 '12 at 17:47
    
No problem man. –  MurifoX Aug 2 '12 at 17:52
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3 Answers 3

My answer assumes you only want a user to be a roomie at one dwelling. If you want a user to be a roomie at more than one dwelling, I think @ari's answer is good, although I might opt for has_and_belongs_to_many instead of has_many :through.

Now for my answer:

I would set it up so that a dwelling belongs_to an owner and has_many roomies (including possibly the owner, but not necessarily).

You can use the User model both for owners and roomies. You don't need any additional tables or models, you just need to setup the proper relationships by using the :class_name and :foreign_key options.

In your Dwelling model:

# dwelling.rb
belongs_to :owner, :class_name => "User", :foreign_key => "owner_id"
has_many :roomies, :class_name => "User"

In your User model:

# user.rb
belongs_to :dwelling # This is where the user lives
has_many :properties, :class_name => "Dwelling", :foreign_key => "owner_id"  # This is the dwellings the user owns

In your dwellings table you need an owner_id column to store the user_id of the owner

In your users table you need a dwelling_id to store the dwelling_id of the dwelling where the user lives.

To answer your question in the comments regarding the controller:

If you want to setup current_user as the owner of the new dwelling, do this:

@dwelling = current_user.properties.build(params[:dwelling])
....

If you want to setup the current_user as the owner AND a roomie of the new dwelling, do this:

@dwelling = current_user.properties.build(params[:dwelling]

if @dwelling.save
  current_user.dwelling = @dwelling
  if current_user.save
     # flash and redirect go here        
  else
     # It's not clear why this wouldn't save, but you'll to determine
     # What to do in such a case.
  end
else
   ...
end

The trickiest part of above is handling the case that the dwelling is valid and saves, but for some unrelated reason the current_user can't be saved. Depending on your application, you may want the dwelling to save anyway, even if you can't assign the current_user as a roomie. Or, you might want the dwelling not to be saved --- if so, you'd need to use a model transaction, which is bit beyond the scope of this question.

Your controller code didn't work because saving the Dwelling doesn't actually update the current_user record to store the dwelling_id. Your code would be equivalent to the following:

@dwelling = Dwelling.new(params[:dwelling])
current_user.dwelling = @dwelling
if @dwelling.save
   ...

Note that current_user is never saved, so the current_user.dwelling = @dwelling line is useless.

This might seem counter-intuitive, but the bottom line is that build_dwelling isn't actually setting up things in memory as you might expect. You'd achieve more intuitive results if you saved the model you're building from rather than the model you're building:

@dwelling = current_user.build_dwelling(params[:dwelling])
if current_user.save # This will save the dwelling (if it is valid)

However, this (by default) won't save the dwelling if it has validation errors unless you turn :autosave on for the association, which is also a bit beyond the scope of this question. I really wouldn't recommend this approach.

Update:

Here is a more detailed code snippet:**

# dwellings_controller.rb

def create
  @dwelling = current_user.properties.build(params[:dwelling])

  if @dwelling.save
    # The current user is now the owner, but we also want to try to assign
    # his as a roomie:
    current_user.dwelling = @dwelling
    if current_user.save
      flash[:notice] = "You have successfully created a dwelling"
    else
       # For some reason, current_user couldn't be assigned as a roomie at the 
       # dwelling.  This could be for several reasons such as validations on the
       # user model that prevent the current_user from being saved.
       flash[:notice] = "You have successfully created a dwelling, but we could not assign you to it as a roomie"
    end
    redirect_to current_user
  else
    # Dwelling could not be saved, so re-display the creation form:
    render :new
  end
end

When a dwelling saves successfully, the current user will be the owner (owner_id in the database). However, if the current_user doesn't save, you'll need to decide how your application should respond to that. In the example above, I allow the dwelling to be saved (i.e. I don't rollback its creation), but I inform the user that he couldn't be assigned as a roomie. When this happens, it's most likely other code in your application causing the problem. You could examine the errors of current_user to see why. Or, you could use current_user.save! instead of current_user.save temporarily to troubleshoot.

Another way to do all of this is with an after_create callback in the Dwelling model. In many ways that would be a cleaner and simpler way to do it. However, catching the case when the current_user can't be saved could be even uglier than the method above, depending on how you want to handle it.

I believe the bottom line is that the current_user.save code is causing some problems. You'll need to diagnose why, and then determine what your application should do in that case. There are several ways to handle this, including at least the following

  1. Put everything in a transaction block, and use current_use.save! instead of current_user.save so that an exception is raised and neither the user or dwelling is saved.
  2. Save the dwelling, but inform the user that he isn't a roomie (As above)
  3. Instead of saving the current_user, use update_column (which avoids callbacks, validations, etc.).

I believe the current problems you're experiencing are essentially unrelated to the original question. If you need further assistance, it might be best to break it off as a separate question.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Its true, your answer is the simplest. –  Ari Aug 3 '12 at 5:27
    
I have updated my question above to reflect the updates to the User and Dwelling models. I also added a dwelling_id column to users and an owner_id column to dwellings. Unless I am missing something else, it looks like the solution might be incomplete, though. I can successfully create a Dwelling through the web interface. However, after creation, none of the relationships exist. user.dwelling and dwelling.owner are nil and dwelling.roomies returns an empty array. Are both of the relationships supposed to be belongs_to? I've included my create action for Dwellings. –  justinraczak Aug 3 '12 at 23:13
    
@justinraczak: The associations are correct. When you use build_dwelling and @dwelling.save, it's like creating a new dwelling, and then assigning that dwelling to the current_user as his home. It is his home in memory, but your controller never saves that fact to the database. I'll update my answer with a better way to setup the controller action. –  Nathan Aug 3 '12 at 23:50
    
@Nathan I think I may not have implemented the solution correctly. I have updated my Dwelling create action above. But admittedly, I got a little confused with the various snippets in the revised answer, so I apologize if I didn't get it quite right. Right now, after a create, the page reloads on the Dwelling form but seems to be in the update state rather than create. When I query the dwelling in the console, the dwelling does have an owner_id but that user does not have the dwelling_id. Have I mixed up the solution? –  justinraczak Aug 4 '12 at 2:09
    
@justinraczak: It sounds like the Dwelling is being saved, but the current_user is not being saved, so your controller is rendering the new view for the saved Dwelling object, which depending on how your view is coded, may just be effectively the same as the update form for the Dwelling. If that's the case, you would want to figure how why the current_user isn't being saved. In any case, if the user doesn't save, you probably don't want to render the new view for the Dwelling. I'll update my answer with some more suggestions. –  Nathan Aug 4 '12 at 3:01
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You could do this by storing Roomie ids as a column in Dwelling

Make a migration:

class AddRoomiesToDwelling < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    add_column :dwelling, :roomies, :text
  end

  def self.down
    remove_column :dwelling, :roomies
  end
end

In your Dwelling model:

class Dwelling < ActiveRecord::Base
  serialize :roomies
end

You can then set the roomie ids with:

roomie_ids = [1, 2, 3, 4]  
@dwelling.roomies = {:ids => roomie_ids}
@dwelling.save!

Taken from the Saving arrays, hashes, and other non-mappable objects in text columns section of this

share|improve this answer
1  
If you set it up this way, you have no easy way to determine which dwelling a particular roomie lives at. You would have to load all of the dwellings and unserialize the list of roomies for each one. –  Nathan Aug 3 '12 at 2:22
    
While this may be a viable approach, it just seems to disregard the value of having a relational database in the first place. No offense @Sabar, I just honestly think this is a poor solution to the problem. –  Nathan Aug 3 '12 at 2:34
    
None taken, I just personally don't like creating another model for this kind of relationship –  Sabar Aug 3 '12 at 2:46
    
Hey @Nathan, that was exactly my concern with this approach. At a high level, this application manages a living situation for roommates - bills, shared expenses/purchases, property, etc. So the relationships between all of the entities/models needs to be explicit and rails-enabled. @Sabar, thanks a lot for the suggestion and it definitely makes sense if it was simply a matter of loosely tracking the relationships. But I need to enable things like Dwelling.roomies or Roomie.dwelling, etc. –  justinraczak Aug 3 '12 at 15:10
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You have two possible options. Depending on your plan, it might be clearer for the dwelling to have_one owner instead of the owner having one dwelling. Then the dwelling would also be able to have users. You can add a column to User called dwelling_id and then you could do dwelling has_many users.

Another option would be to use the "has_many through" association. This means you would need to create a new model that would keep track of this association, say "Relationship.rb", which would belong to both User and Dwelling (and have columns for both for them). Then you would be able to write code like this:

//in Dwelling.rb
has_many :roomies, through: :relationships, source: :user

//in User.rb
has_many :dwellings, through: :relationships

This would let users also join more than one dwelling.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Ari, thanks so much for the suggestions. I think I am going to attempt to go the second route, creating the second table to house a relationship between the two via roomies. In this case, would the Roomie_Relationship.rb model be an empty model? –  justinraczak Aug 2 '12 at 19:51
    
Also, do I need to add anything to my User model to enable this? I get the following error with the above implementation: ActiveRecord::HasManyThroughAssociationNotFoundError: Could not find the association :dwelling_roomie_relationships in model Dwelling I have added to my Dwelling model: belongs_to :user has_many :roomies, through: :dwelling_roomie_relationships, source: :user And dwelling_roomie_relationships.rb is an empty model. –  justinraczak Aug 2 '12 at 20:02
    
The relationship will need to have columns for each. You also need to add similar code to the User model, see my edit. Read my link to find out more about the topic. –  Ari Aug 3 '12 at 2:00
    
+1 This is a good answer if you intend for a given user to be a roomie at more than one dwelling. The answer I provided would only work if any given user was a roomie at only one dwelling. Of course, a simple HABTM relationship with a simple join table would be simpler and more direct unless you need additional properties for the relationship. Using has_many :through when has_and_belongs_to_many would suffice is controversial. –  Nathan Aug 3 '12 at 2:26
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