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My basic situation: I have an include file that has something like #define foo (Flag1 | Flags2 | Flag3), so it's a predefined combination of bit flags. For the sake of type-safety, I wanted to replace these #defines by static consts, i.e. static const int foo = (Flag1 | Flag2 | Flag3) (or similar). This include file is included in dozens of places in the program.

Now when I'm doing a release build with all relevant optimisation options enabled (using the C++ compiler of VS2010), replacing the #defines seems to increase the executable by a few KiB, depending on how many constants I replaced.

Why does this happen? To my knowledge, integer constants are supposed to be "inlined" into the ASM code that is produced if possible, and I don't see how using a static const vs #define would make a difference here. Clearly, the variable isn't inlined as the disassembly shows:

#define:
01325041  or          eax,0FFD87FE0h
static int:
011E5451  or          eax,dword ptr [CMainFrame::s_TemplateModulePaths+38h (151F008h)]

So the final question is: How can I avoid #define but still rely on the variable being inserted directly into the generated assembly?

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What are Flag1, Flag2, Flag3? Are those just placeholders you've put here that are actually literals, or are they themselves macros, or constants? –  Omaha Aug 2 '12 at 14:19
1  
Are you compiling with optimizations? Why static? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 2 '12 at 14:19
2  
If those are member variables (which the disassembly suggests), you really need to mention that in the question. –  Ben Voigt Aug 2 '12 at 14:20
    
Where are the ints defined? In a header or a .cpp file? –  Anon Mail Aug 2 '12 at 14:21
2  
Try using your constant as an array size. Like int dummy[foo]. If the compiler refuses to accept it, you are doing something wrong. I.e. you are somehow turning it into a non-compile-time constant. (BTW, for non-member const declarations static is unneseccary. const in C++ is already static by itself). –  AndreyT Aug 2 '12 at 14:42

5 Answers 5

There is no reason the compiler couldn't eliminate the static const variable. If you're compiling with optimizations turned on, I'm surprised that VC++ doesn't do that.

I tried compiling this code with gcc.

enum { FLAG1 = 1 << 0, FLAG2 = 1 << 1, FLAG3 = 1 << 2 };

static const int foo = (FLAG1 | FLAG2 | FLAG3);

int main(){
    return foo;
}

With optimizations turned off, it inlined the value but still reserved storage space for the variable.

_main:
LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushl   %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    .cfi_offset 5, -8
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 5
    andl    $-16, %esp
    call    ___main
    movl    $7, %eax  ;value inlined
    leave
    .cfi_restore 5
    .cfi_def_cfa 4, 4
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
LFE0:
    .section .rdata,"dr"
    .align 4
__ZL3foo:                     ; storage space for foo
    .long   7

At O2 it inlined the value and got rid of the storage space.

_main:
LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushl   %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    .cfi_offset 5, -8
    movl    %esp, %ebp
   .cfi_def_cfa_register 5
    andl    $-16, %esp
    call    ___main
    movl    $7, %eax    ; value inlined
    leave
    .cfi_restore 5
    .cfi_def_cfa 4, 4
    ret
   .cfi_endproc
LFE0:
; no storage space for foo

My only thought other that incorrect compiler settings, or VC++ failing to make this optimization, is that the Flags variables might not be compile-time constants which would mean that the value of the expression has to be computed at program start-up, which would prevent inlining.

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As AndreyT pointed out in a comment above, it seems that VC++ fails to recognize the value as being constant, as it is being generated by an overladed and typesafe operator|. –  j_schultz Aug 2 '12 at 14:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As seen in the comments, the typesafe operator| overloading for my enums seems to prevent VC++ from inlining the ORed value. I guess I'll keep using the #define version as I hate increasing the executable size if there's no benefits (no, this is not premature optimization) - after all, it doesn't increase readability, and since the combination of flags is already of my flagset enum type, I also don't lose any type-safety, I guess.

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Storage for the value itself may be optimized away, and the function may be inlined, but the inlined instructions can still take up space. It's little consolation anyway and there's no reason the compiler shouldn't fix it… but MSVC is used in fewer space-critical applications than GCC, so they just might not care enough. –  Potatoswatter Aug 3 '12 at 12:54
#define ERROR_1 int(1)
#define ERROR_2 int(2)

etc...

and then, you'll have the value directly in the instruction, and you will also have type checking :) and without any optimisation parameter.

In my opinion, the static const int BLABLA=1; stuff is only there to add a namespace to some constants... and use more ram and ram access in the code, what is really pointless when the symbol for a #define constant have to be unique, and when the reference to an error code in memory is less consistent (any malware/bug can modify these values in ram during run time) than the immediate value of this error code, directly in the instruction.

But it is more about modern programming politics... some will claim, use public static const int, and others (like me and Microsoft) prefer the simpler version #define.

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You're missing the point because a compiler can do the same optimizations to a static const int as it can do to a #define; as I have explained in my accepted solution, it simply failed to do this optimization because of my typesafe operator overloads. It could have failed with the #define method as well. And what you write about malware is absolute nonsense too, since where do you imagine the value of the define to be stored? In a unicorn that cannot be touched by malware? –  j_schultz Mar 18 at 14:44

You can solve your problem by looking at it from another perspective: you may put the data and the functions that use it close together.

In an OO language, this means making your constant foo a private static attribute of a class. This class should have as public methods all the functions that use foo. Being a static private attribute, it will be defined in the .cpp file, and there will be just one instance of it in the executable footprint.

I understand this would be a big change in your code, and not a simple refactorying: surely it's not as simple as modifying the definition of foo from #define to a static global constant. But keeping data and methods that use them close together (i.e.: in the same class) will bring you many non-functional advantages.

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That sounds like a lot of useless wrapping that would even bloat the code size more. –  KillianDS Aug 2 '12 at 14:43
    
@KillianDS Of course it depends on how you choose the class and its methods. In my experience, it sounds a bit strange that you use a set of flags in many different functions: maybe those functions should become methods of a class. Furthermore, flags are usually applied to data. Those data should become data members of the class. Definitely that's not useless wrapping, if you do it the right way. –  Daniele Aug 2 '12 at 14:46
    
@KillianDS If you make the flags private static members of your class, you have just one instance of it in all your code: you don't waste any space. –  Daniele Aug 2 '12 at 14:50
    
It could be a better solution, it could be not. Suppose he's simply using it to mask out some bits in a wireline protocol, wrapping that functionality would be quite cumbersome and generally useless. It could very well be that classes are better, but OO is far from the answer to everything, and with the little information about the use case that was given, blindly suggesting OO is just suggesting code bloat imo. –  KillianDS Aug 2 '12 at 15:03
    
@KillianDS I never said OO is the answer to everything, but "if you do it OO, do it right". As we don't know what he's using the flags for, we cannot say if my solution is the best, but similarly we cannot say if your solution is best. I just gave him an option. Context first of all. –  Daniele Aug 2 '12 at 15:11

My guess is that you have static const int foo = (Flag1 | Flag2 | Flag3) in a header file. This causes a version of the constant to be stored in every object file separately. The #define embeds the literal which are all combined by pooling.

Try this, in one C++ file have const int foo = (Flag1 | Flag2 | Flag3), then in the header have extern const int foo.


Update

Sorry if my answer didn't suit your needs. I addressed the question of file size for static const variables.

I guess it's all in what you want. Unless a section of code is causing performance issues, I would never worry about this kind inline of optimization. For me, type safety and file size are things I value above CPU optimization. In addition, an extern const allows for better analysis by coverage and timing tools.

Premature optimization is the root of all evil (or at least most of it) in programming.

Donald Knuth

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6  
This suggestion will completely eliminate the possibility of the constants being "inlined". I.e. this would ensure the exact opposite of what the OP wants. –  AndreyT Aug 2 '12 at 14:40
    
I know about the possibility to use extern, but that just makes the code ugly and it doesn't really solve the problem. I'd rather keep using #define in that case, as that's guaranteed to be inserted directly in the code. –  j_schultz Aug 2 '12 at 14:42
    
@j_schultz I updated my answer. Sorry if it doesn't suit you needs. –  Jeffery Thomas Aug 2 '12 at 15:50
    
@Jeffery Thomas: This isn't about premature optimization. But whenenver I see that my executable is getting bigger for no apparent reason, I want to stop it. Other people might say "but it's only 4kb, why would you wonder about that", and my reply is "why should I waste these 4kb if I don't have to" - plus of course, I was interested in why it happens. –  j_schultz Aug 2 '12 at 16:52
    
@j_schultz I would be surprised if extern const int caused a large change in file size. static const int injects the same code into every object file. I don't have access to the MS compiler right now. What happens if you replace static const int foo = (Flag1 | Flag2 | Flag3) with enum { foo = (Flag1 | Flag2 | Flag3) }. I'm not sure if that gets you any of the type safety you are looking for. –  Jeffery Thomas Aug 3 '12 at 20:14

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