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I'm writing a library that wraps a third party web service call and am trying to make the library use the new async/await features. What is the proper use of the async/await keywords in the following example?

public class MyApi
{
    public Task<ApiResult> DoSomethingAsync()
    {
        return this.DoSomethingCore();
    }

    public async Task<ApiResult> DoSomethingElseAsync()
    {
        return await this.DoSomethingCore();
    }

    private async Task<ApiResult> DoSomethingCore()
    {
        var httpClient = new HttpClient();
        var httpResponseMessage = await httpClient.GetAsync("some url");
        var rawResultText = await httpResponseMessage.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
        return new ApiResult(rawResultText);        
    }
}

To allow my caller to await the DoSomethingAsync method, should that method also have the async and await keywords added to it? Or is it fine as-is because it returns a Task? Is there a better pattern for this sort of nesting?

I think the DoSomethingAsync method is the correct way to go here, is that correct? I believe DoSomethingElseAsync seems the wrong approach when building a library.

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C# 5.0 does not exists, the next version is 4.5, do you happen to mean that? –  Ramhound Aug 2 '12 at 15:13
9  
@Ramhound - The next CLR is 4.5, the next language is C#5 –  Henk Holterman Aug 2 '12 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Any Task can be awaited, regardless of where it came from.

I'm not sure why DoSomethingAsync just calls DoSomethingCore, since DoSomethingAsync could just as easily be async and use await.

There is also a general rule that you should use ConfigureAwait(false) in library methods.

Edit: If you don't need to use await, then don't make the method async. async will add some overhead (check Channel9 for Stephen Toub's Zen of Async Performance video). If you can just return a Task (like DoSomethingAsync), then do it that way.

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DoSomethingAsync calls DoSomethingCore because in my real-life scenario, I have two similar public methods that share functionality by using a core method. I will look into the ConfigureAwait method, as I had not seen that before. –  Brian Vallelunga Aug 2 '12 at 18:57
    
I've added a DoSomethingElseAsync() method to better explain what I was confused about. I believe you have explained this sufficiently and that the DoSomethingAsync() method is the way to go for a library method. –  Brian Vallelunga Aug 2 '12 at 19:02
    
OK. See updated answer. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 2 '12 at 21:03

The formulation below is functional, but will likely cause additional overhead (due to having a secondary callback for the additional async/await method.)

public async Task<ApiResult> DoSomethingElseAsync()
{
    return await this.DoSomethingCore();
}

It's simpler to return the Task directly, as you can always await that Task elsewhere without having to have the method implemented as 'async'. Async/await is a lot like using 'yield return'; it does some compiler magic to implement the 'yielding', but the enumeration itself doesn't care how you implement it. Likewise, an 'await' call doesn't care how the awaitable works, as long as it's awaitable.

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