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In Java, is there a way to enforce a constraint that any Class that implements an interface has a no-arg constructor? If not can you enforce that it has a factory that returns an instance of the class?

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Depending on why you want this, it is likely you can find a way to lift this requirement. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 2 '12 at 14:40
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not on the interface, but you can write a class with a factory method:

public abstract class Foo {

    private Foo() {}

    public static Bar createBar() {
        return new BarImpl();
    }

}

public interface Bar {}

Bar myBar = Foo.createBar();

That's how Java exposes their factory methods on classes like Calendar.java.

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In Java, is there a way to enforce a constraint that any Class that implements an interface has a no-arg constructor?

Not at compile-time, no.

If not can you enforce that it has a factory that returns an instance of the class?

Not at compile-time, no.

Unit tests can check for both of these, of course, if you can work out the types to check.

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No, to both. In general, though, you should neither want or need to do that.

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+1 to the second part, especially. OP, why do you want this? –  yshavit Aug 2 '12 at 14:43
    
How can you say there is never a case when I'd want to guarantee a certain behavior from a class. If that is the case, why even have inheritance? –  Joe Aug 2 '12 at 16:30
    
Joe, it's exactly because you want certain behavior that you shouldn't mandate restrictions on type. A Java interface specifies exactly that - an interface. You generally shouldn't care what the run-time type of an object is; you just want to know what operations it supports (what interfaces it implements). –  davmac Aug 3 '12 at 12:45
    
Actually, a number of popular frameworks would be well served by an interface that guarantees a no-arg constructor. Frameworks like Hibernate, Stripes, and others will sometimes presume that a class has a no-arg constructor and will throw an error if it doesn't. –  Joe Aug 6 '12 at 15:13
    
I think these are the exceptions rather than the rule. –  davmac Aug 6 '12 at 17:02
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