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I had some fun making my first shaders and my first test subject was a 100x100 quad faced picture. I thought I would learn how to use TRIANGLE_STRIP so I switched it, moved one of the vertex calls so it would look square again. Turned my shader on and there was a duplicate right behind it of only one face but it had the entire texture on it. I have only one set of draw calls for this shape....

Heres my shape code:

glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP);
    float vx;
    float vy;
    for(float x=0; x<100; x++){
        for(float y=0; y<100; y++){
            float vx=x/5.0;
            float vy=y/5.0;
            glTexCoord2f(0.01*x, 0.01*y);
            glVertex3f(vx, vy, 0);

            glTexCoord2f(0.01+0.01*x, 0.01*y);
            glVertex3f(.2+vx, vy, 0);

            glTexCoord2f(0.01*x, 0.01+0.01*y);
            glVertex3f(vx, .2+vy, 0);

            glTexCoord2f(0.01+0.01*x, 0.01+0.01*y);
            glVertex3f(.2+vx, .2+vy, 0);
    }}
glEnd();

And my (vertex) shader code:

uniform float uTime,uWaveintensity,uWavespeed;
uniform float uZwave1,uZwave2,uXwave,uYwave;
void main(){
vec4 position = gl_Vertex;
gl_TexCoord[0] = gl_MultiTexCoord0;
position.z=((sin(position.x+uTime*uWavespeed)*uZwave1)+(sin(position.y+uTime*uWavespeed))*uZwave2)*uWaveintensity;
position.x=position.x+(sin(position.x+uTime*uWavespeed)*uXwave)*uWaveintensity;
position.y=position.y+(sin(position.y+uTime*uWavespeed)*uYwave)*uWaveintensity;
gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * position;
}

If anyone has any info on drawing more efficiently with shared vertices(triangle_strips) I've googled but I don't understand any so far XD. I wanna know.

screenshot(s): with 8x8 faces

enter image description here

same thing same angle,lines=ghost

enter image description here

I see whats happening now, but I don't know how to fix it.

share|improve this question
    
With such problems -it ALWAYS helps to post screenshots. Preferably, also post screenshots with glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT, GL_LINE) so we can see what's going on with your vertices. –  ananthonline Aug 2 '12 at 15:13
    
Sorry I didn't know you could post screenshots. Or you mean links...nvm I see –  Kaliber64 Aug 2 '12 at 16:14
    
jo @Kaliber64 are you still there? –  Joe Blow Aug 21 at 17:12
    
Did you need something? –  Kaliber64 Oct 8 at 3:45

1 Answer 1

I don't think you can create a 100x100 quad plane with triangle strips this way. Now you're going by rows and columns just in one direction, which means that the last 2 vertices of first row will create a triangle with the first vertex of the second row and that's not what you want.

I'd suggest you to start with 2x2 pattern just to learn how triangle strips work, then move to 3x3 and 4x4 to see what is a difference between odd and even situations. When you have some understanding of the problems you can create universal algorithm and change your size to 100.

After this all you can focus on the vertex shader to make it waving.

And for the future: never start from big data if you're learning how the things work. :)

EDIT:

Since I wrote this answer I learned that you already CAN make two dimmensional grid with one tri-strip, using degenerate triangles :).

When a triangle uses the same vertex twice it will be ignored by the rasterizer during rendering, so at the end of your first strip you can create a degenerate triangle using last vertex of first strip and first vertex of the second strip. It doesn't matter which of the two vertexes you'll use as the 3rd one, as long as they are in the correct order (e.g. 1,1,2 or 1,2,2). This way you've created a triangle that won't be drawn, but it will move the next 'starting' point to beginning of your 2nd strip, where you can continue building your mesh.

The drawback is that you create some triangles, that will be transformed but not drawn (there will be not many of them), but the advantage is that you run just one 'draw strip' command to GPU which is much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I see what you mean I'ma try it out, thanks. –  Kaliber64 Aug 2 '12 at 16:10
    
All the faces of the real one are present. And you can't see the ghost unless its wavy! However the ghost is missing corners, 2 I think. I don't see any defects with the real one. Getting screenshots. –  Kaliber64 Aug 2 '12 at 16:18

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