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I have a small doubt.

I am adding some extra functions in a C++ code and these functions are getting called by functions of a class.

Is it necessary to make these extra functions a part of class or can a C++ class function call a C function?

If yes, how should the makefile be modified ?

Thanks!

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Of course class functions can call freestanding functions. No problem with that. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 2 '12 at 15:00
    
It is possible to have free functions in C++, and it has nothing to do with makefiles. –  juanchopanza Aug 2 '12 at 15:01
    
It depends. If the new function being added needed to access class members, then it should be part of class. And yes, a C++ class member function can call a C function. –  Mahesh Aug 2 '12 at 15:02
    
About C functions: yes, about makefile: doesn't make any difference. –  Desmond Hume Aug 2 '12 at 15:02
    
If a free helper function is called from the class, any members needed can be passed as parameters. The function does not have to be a member itself. –  Bo Persson Aug 2 '12 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

As long as you have included some declaration and the C function is linked in it some point in the compilation, you can call C functions in any C++ function. For instance:

mycfunc.h:

void test(int x);

myfunc.c:

void test(int x) {
  printf("%d\n", x);
}

Now, simply include the header file where you want to use the function. In your Makefile, simply make sure you include "myfunc.c" (or .o if you're compiling objects) in the final compilation.

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ok... thanks One more thing, for compiling C++ files we use "g++ filename.c -o filename" whereas for compiling C files we use "gcc" instead of "g++". Would the inclusion of ".c" files in the make file create an issue with "g++" compilation syntax? –  sam32 Aug 2 '12 at 15:06
    
@sam32: Possibly. You need to know about the extern "C" specifier, which allows C++ code to have (create or call) functions with C-compatible names. Normally C++ names are not C compatible, because C++ allows overloading. –  Ben Voigt Aug 2 '12 at 15:07
    
that means I can't compile ".c" files with ".cpp" files simply by including ".c" file names in the makefile? –  sam32 Aug 2 '12 at 15:13
    
@sam32 if the ".c" files are C++ files, there is no problem if you use g++. But if you let make use implicit rules then it will try to compile files ending in ".c" as C code, using gcc. –  juanchopanza Aug 2 '12 at 15:23

C++ is not a pure object oriented language.

So you can use imperative form as it is in C ( even if it's modular or not ).

Some C functions not encapsulated in Objects are accessible using c* includes (ctime for instance).

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You do not need to put them in a class. Functions exist in C++ just as in C so you can just use them. Just try it and ask again if you have trouble. As you state that you add functions to a C++ project, just treat (and think of) all your code as C++. Put your new stuff in files using the same filename extensions as those of the rest of the project.

Edit in response to comment from OP:

Yes, no need to think about the distinction between C and C++ in this case. Just write .cpp files. And in the makefile, just add those files just as the other files are listed there.

The distinction between C and C++ is important if you have existing C++ code and need to use if from C, or for example if you have existing C libraries and need to call that from C++. In your case there's very likely no reason not to stick to C++. Unlike Java, it's completely natural to have free standing functions. There even many in the C++ standard library.

Now, if in your case it is good design to have free standing functions instead of adding to classes (modifying or using inheritance) is hard to tell given the information you have posted. But, if what you need to do can be done in a natural way without accessing the private parts of existing classes the answer may very well be yes.

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you mean to say, that the standalone files that I would be adding(that contains my added C functions) should be named as with ".cpp" extension rather than ".c" extension???? Am i right? and then in the makefile, I just go on and add the new files that I have created? –  sam32 Aug 2 '12 at 15:20
    
yes. I updated the answer. –  Johan Lundberg Aug 2 '12 at 16:23

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