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I am creating a report that has a pareto-like graph and a table of Order Types and how many units of each order type there are. The subset returned from the stored procedure that I am using includes a field called WorkItemId, and if that value is null that means that item isn't to be counted. How should I count Order Types in the report without including the values that have the null WorkItemId? Right now I am using the expression:

Count(Fields!OrderType.Value) 

to count the each unit for a specific order type.

Thanks!

EDIT: WorkItemId is what cannot be null to be counted, not Order Type

Null values in WorkItemId are needed in other reports, so I can't just simply filter them in SQL.

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Is it SQL issue or Visual studio 2005 issue? –  MUY Belgium Aug 2 '12 at 15:29
    
Visual studio, I just need to find a way to count specific order types with the constraint of the WorkItemId not being null (not in SQL). –  DevonEilers Aug 2 '12 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

You can use something like

Sum(IIF(IsNothing(Fields!WorkItemId.Value),0,1))
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Use a where clause in your SQL clause :

 where WorkItemId is not null

Hope it helps.

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The NULL value in WorkItemId is needed for other reports, is there any other way? –  DevonEilers Aug 2 '12 at 15:11
    
This aims to be used on the side of the database : The where clause is added into the SELECT SQL request. –  MUY Belgium Aug 2 '12 at 15:39
    
I deleted my first comment, see the new one above. –  DevonEilers Aug 2 '12 at 15:46

Figured out my own question...Again

Since the row in my table is already being grouped by order type I just needed to put

Fields!WorkItemId.Value

Into the Count function rather than OrderType, since Count() automatically disgards nulls.

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