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I'm reading a book to learn Objective-C and this program is suppose to show key concepts in dealing with pointers, and I'm really lost.

Is there some kind of conversion happening in the function's arguments that turn p1, p2, &il, and &i2 to the value (*) of a pointer? Like p1 turns into *p1?

I thought a copy of the variable was passed into the function instead of the actual variable, so why was the value of the passed in variable changed after the function?

Also why am I getting a warning on the 3rd line that says: No previous prototype for function 'exchangeValues'?

Thank you!!

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

void exchangeValues (int *pint1, int *pint2) {
    int temp;

    temp = *pint1;
    *pint1 = *pint2;
    *pint2 = temp;
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        void exchangeValues (int *pint1, int *pint2);
        int il = -5, i2 = 66, *p1 = &il, *p2 = &i2;

        NSLog(@"il = %i, i2 = %i", il, i2);

        exchangeValues(p1, p2);
        NSLog(@"il = %i, i2 = %i", il, i2);

        exchangeValues(&il, &i2);
        NSLog(@"il = %i, i2 = %i", il, i2);
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

2012-08-02 11:13:38.569 Test[381:707] il = -5, i2 = 66
2012-08-02 11:13:38.571 Test[381:707] il = 66, i2 = -5
2012-08-02 11:13:38.572 Test[381:707] il = -5, i2 = 66
share|improve this question
    
make int temp; into int *temp otherwise it may appear that temp is an integer (in this case it is being used as an pointer to an int) –  Ramchandra Apte Aug 2 '12 at 15:37
    
@RamchandraApte No, int is correct here, temp = *pint1; stores the value pint1 points to in temp. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 2 '12 at 15:42
    
@DanielFischer Correct, I'm not very used to C/C++ (i'm a Pythonista) –  Ramchandra Apte Aug 4 '12 at 12:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say that's a complex example if you are being taught about pointers!

Is there some kind of conversion happening in the function's arguments that turn p1, p2, &il, and &i2 to the value (*) of a pointer? Like p1 turns into *p1?

p1 and p2 are declared as int * (pointer to int) and are initialised with the address of i1 and i2 (using the & operator).

I thought a copy of the variable was passed into the function instead of the actual variable, so why was the value of the passed in variable changed after the function?

A copy of the variable is passed to the function, however in this case the variable of type int * (pointer to int). The reason the value is changing is because the exchangeValues() function is dereferencing those pointers and swapping the values. This is the only way (in C/Objective-C) a function can modify a variable outside of its own scope, other than the variable being assigned as the return value from a function.

Also why am I getting a warning on the 3rd line that says: No previous prototype for function 'exchangeValues'?

You seem to have typed it in wrong; remove the line below @autoreleasepool:

@autoreleasepool {
    void exchangeValues (int *pint1, int *pint2);   <-- delete this line
share|improve this answer
    
But why is &i1 and &i2 allowed to be passed in? What happens when those two are passed in? –  stumped Aug 2 '12 at 15:55
1  
remember &i1 is the address of i1, which is the same as your pointer p1 in this instance (this is where you need to be able to draw the box with an arrow to another box classic pointer diagram;) –  bph Aug 2 '12 at 16:01
1  
in other words the type of &i1 and p1 is int *. As the type is equivalent and the match the function parameter type they are 'allowed' to be passed as parameters to that function –  bph Aug 2 '12 at 16:09
    
I see. Thank you so much! –  stumped Aug 2 '12 at 16:10

its a little confusing how the variables have been declared and initialised all in a row like that but basically you have:

i1 is an int set to -5 p1 is a pointer to an int set to the address of i1

same goes for i2 and p2

No conversion is taking place. You're effectively 'swapping' the values that those pointers point to in the function.

Pointers are confusing things but stick with it and it will become clear with enough parctice and example code like this...

share|improve this answer

I thought a copy of the variable was passed into the function instead of the actual variable, so why was the value of the passed in variable changed after the function?

A copy of the pointer is passed to the function here. So what the function has points to the memory locations the variables l1 and l2 are stored at. So

void exchangeValues (int *pint1, int *pint2) {
    int temp;

    temp = *pint1;   // store the value that pint1 points to in temp
    *pint1 = *pint2; // store the value pint2 points to where pint1 points to
    *pint2 = temp;   // store the value saved in temp where pint2 points to
}
share|improve this answer

If you pass a pointer into the function, it indeed passes a copy of that pointer- but it still refers to the same address in memory. So de-referencing that pointer will still point to a variable that's outside of the function scope.

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