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I have two table called Project and ProjectComments on my database.

I mapped them these two tables to my Entity Framework Model with generator.

Each project have many ProjectComments. I don't want to add ProjectComments as a navigation property to Project because i want to write a GetProjectComments function to Project class.

Btw i can make desicion in GetProjectComments function for IsDeleted column of ProjectComments table. Because i don't really delete any rows from ProjectComments table, i only make its IsDeleted = true if i need to delete, thus i shouldn't return ProjectComments whose IsDeleted = true in GetProjectComments function.

It's okay up to now. The problem is that in GetProjectComments function of Project class i need provider(context object) as parameter to call SaveChanges method of the same provider.

Is there any method to make these approach without asking provider object as a parameter in GetProjectComments function. Am i doing something wrong??

Looking for you reply. Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
I don't want to add ProjectComments as a navigation property to Project because i want to write a GetProjectComments function to Project class. Why ? – Raphaël Althaus Aug 2 '12 at 16:02
    
Because i want to return ProjectComments only if it's IsDeleted = false. – Sinem Bozacı Aug 2 '12 at 16:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Easier :

Add a ProjectComments navigation property in Project class (well let the generator do the job)

Add a new property in a partial "Project" class

public IEnumerable<ProjectComments> LivingComments {
   get {
      return this.ProjectComments != null 
         ? this.ProjectComments.Where(m => !m.IsDeleted) 
         : null;
   }
}

EDIT or as danludwig stated

public IEnumerable<ProjectComments> GetLivingComments() {
     return this.ProjectComments != null 
         ? this.ProjectComments.Where(m => !m.IsDeleted) 
         : null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, except I would probably keep this as a method instead of a property, since it may have SQL loading implications. – danludwig Aug 2 '12 at 16:16
    
@danludwig why not, but it won't change the SQL loading implications, no ? – Raphaël Althaus Aug 2 '12 at 16:19
1  
Making it a method won't change the SQL loading implications, no. I think when you make something a method, it just looks more expensive than a property, so you're more likely to call it just once and save the result into a var. – danludwig Aug 2 '12 at 16:26
    
@danludwig Ok. I have a little preference for readonly properties in these cases, but I can understand that point of view. – Raphaël Althaus Aug 2 '12 at 16:32
1  
@SinemBozacı, for that reason, I would not store deleted comments within the same entity set as non-deleted comments. Have tried this approach out before, it doesn't work out very well. You are probably better off storing the deleted entities in another set (or db) or using a different archival / history strategy. – danludwig Aug 2 '12 at 20:47

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