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namespace settings{
  typedef wchar_t char_t;
  typedef std::basic_string<char_t> string_t;
}

namespace util{
  namespace string{
    std::basic_string<wchar_t>  toWide(const std::basic_string<char>&      s);
    std::basic_string<char>     fromWide(const std::basic_string<wchar_t>& w);
  }
}

This is what I've. char_t may be wchar_t or char. Now I want two functions that intelligently convert the input string settings::string_t

settings::string_t  from(const std::basic_string<char>& s);
settings::string_t  from(const std::basic_string<wchar_t>& s);

using boost::is_same doesn't work on return s because string_t typedef'ed as wstring but returns string

settings::string_t util::string::from(const std::basic_string< char >& s){
  if(boost::is_same< std::basic_string<char> , settings::string_t >::value){
    return s;
  }else{
    return toWide(s);
  }
}

It is east to identify whether InputType and string_t is same or not using template as well as overloads, but If they are not same then there comes 4 variations.

How to model this scenario without overloading type operator ?

Summary

How can I design the settings::string_t from(const std::basic_string<T>& s); that converts both char and wchar strings to string_t. Where T can also be char or wchar_t. and you can see in the question string_t is flexible. it can also be both char or wchar_t strings

share|improve this question
    
How can I design the settings::string_t from(const std::basic_string<T>& s); that converts both char and wchar strings to string_t. Where T can also be char or wchar_t. and you can see in the question string_t is flexible. it can also be both char or wchar_t strings –  Neel Basu Aug 2 '12 at 17:05
    
"How to model this scenario without overloading type operator ?" What do you mean by this? –  Dave S Aug 2 '12 at 17:09
    
Sorry If I am not clear enough what I want is settings::string_t from(const std::basic_string<T>& s) that converts both char and wchar strings to string_t –  Neel Basu Aug 2 '12 at 17:11
    
I believe the problem is that you would have to provide 4 conversions: from char to char, from char to wchar, from wchar to wchar and from wchar to char. OP is trying to avoid those 4 checks. –  mfontanini Aug 2 '12 at 17:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can't remove all of the overloads, as you have different functions to convert each direction. I used a template specialization of a structure, but it should be possible to do it with overloads as well.

The helper class (and it's specializations) can easily be placed in a namespace to move it so it's not as visible to the user (for an example, see any of the detail namespaces under boost). Also, it will fail to compile if some combination is used without providing the necessary specialization.

template<typename FromCharT, typename ToCharT>
struct helper;

// If T is the same on both sides, just copy
template<typename T>
struct helper<T, T>
{
   static std::basic_string<T> convert(const std::basic_string<T>& s)
   {
      return s;
   } 
};

// char -> wchar_t
template<>
struct helper<char, wchar_t>
{
   static std::basic_string<wchar_t> convert(const std::basic_string<char>& s)
   {
      return toWide(s);
   } 
};

// wchar_t -> char
template<>
struct helper<wchar_t, char>
{
   static std::basic_string<char> convert(const std::basic_string<wchar_t>& s)
   {
      return fromWide(s);
   } 
};


template<typename T>
settings::string_t from( const std::basic_string<T>& f)
{
   return helper<T, settings::char_t>::convert(f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. and How it can be done with overload (no template) ? –  Neel Basu Aug 2 '12 at 18:02
    
Basically, it would involve an overload that passes through string_t from(const string_t&), and then a pair of overloads that use boost::enable_if and boost::is_same that chooses which to use based on the current settings::char_t. I don't have time to type it up myself. –  Dave S Aug 2 '12 at 18:29

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