Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I run into this fairly frequently. I have a batch of data (stored in CSV, XML, it doesn't matter) in some version of this format:

key1|value1
key1|value2
key1|value3
key2|value4
key2|value5
etc.

and need to be able to handle it in this form:

data[key1] => [value1, value2, value3]
data[key2] => [value4, value5]
etc.

What's the best approach to converting from A to B? I typically loop over the list like this (pseudocode), but I don't like that I have to repeat my array building code.

data = []
values = []
currentKey = ""
foreach (line in inputData) {
    key, value = split(line)
    if ((currentKey != "") and (currentKey != key)) {
        data[currentKey] = values
        values = []
    }
    currentKey = key
    values.add(value)
}
// this is the part I don't like, but it's necessary to capture the last group
data[currentKey] = values

I'm specifically not naming a language, since I've had to do this in at least Javascript, C#, Perl, and PHP. If there are language-specific solutions that would be great, but I'm really looking for the most efficient general algorithmic approach.

share|improve this question
3  
your algorithm uses the fact that the values are grouped by key. actually, you can avoid this, making the code clearer: if (!(key in dictionary)) dictionary.add(key, empty); dictionary[key].add(value) –  Vlad Aug 2 '12 at 17:03
    
I think in simplifying things for the question I lost an important piece, which is that I often need to have all the values collected before I put them into data[currentKey] -- sometimes it's a SQL call or I'm writing out to a file. I think the bigger problem is that I'm trying to be cute by combining the reading and writing and should loop through to parse once, then loop through the parsed data to create the output. –  Nate Cook Aug 3 '12 at 5:56
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can change your code to this:

data = {}

currentKey = ""

foreach (line in inputData) {

    key, value = split(line)
    if (currentKey != key) {
        data[key] = [] // like data.put(key,new ArrayList<String>()) in java
    }
    data[key].add(value) // like data.get(key).add(value) in java
    currentKey = key
}
share|improve this answer
2  
It's probably preferable to skip the whole currentkey business and just check if the key exists in the hash/dict/array on each line, adding an empty array for it if it doesn't. This avoids the whole "keys must be grouped in the input" issue as well. –  Wooble Aug 2 '12 at 17:37
    
You are right, that's the way I would do that. I thought he want to solve only the last line issue. –  barak1412 Aug 2 '12 at 18:50
add comment

Here is a solution. First, create a map. For each entry in your data file, find the key and value. Check if the key is in the map. If it isn't, add a new list to the map containing the new value for that key. If the key is already in the map, just add the new value to the list.

def hash = [:]
new File("test.data").eachLine { String line ->
    def (key,value)  = line.split(/\|/)
    hash.get(key, []) << value
}

println hash

It prints out the following map:

[key1:[value1, value2, value3], key2:[value4, value5]]

No need to keep track of currentKey.

Edit: This is written in Groovy, but should be implemented quite similarly in other languages. hash.get() returns the value for the key, or the provided default value (in the above snippet, an empty list), while the left-shift (<<) operator adds something to the list.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.