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Is there a different way to concatenate variables in perl? I accidentally wrote the following line of code:

print "$linenumber is: \n" . $linenumber;

And that resulted in output like:

22 is:
22

I was expecting:

$linenumber is:
22

So then I wondered. It must be interpreting the $linenumber in the double quotes as a reference to the variable. (how cool!)

I am just wondering: What are caveats to using this method and could someone explain how this works?

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Technically you don't need to concatenate the variables, as print can take more than one argument. print '$linenumber is: \n', $linenumber; works as well. (Although you need to be aware of the built-in variable $, (see man perlvar). –  chepner Aug 2 '12 at 17:42
1  
'$linenumber is: \n' isn't going to do what you want :-) –  Dave Cross Aug 3 '12 at 10:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Variable interpolation occurs when you use double quotes. So, special characters need to be escaped. In this case, you need to escape the $:

print "\$linenumber is: \n" . $linenumber;

It can be rewritten as:

print "\$linenumber is: \n$linenumber";

To avoid string interpolation, use single quotes:

print '$linenumber is: ' . "\n$linenumber";  # No need to escape `$`
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Oh! Did not notice that. I have updated it. Thank you. –  Alan Haggai Alavi Aug 3 '12 at 0:42
    
When interpolating variables and the variable name boundary is not clear (e.g. "my $page = 12; print "$pagep."), you need to enclose the variable name inside braces ${...}. I.e. print "${page}p." –  Aurimas Jun 24 '13 at 22:12

If you change your code from

print "$linenumber is: \n" . $linenumber;

to

print '$linenumber is:' . "\n" . $linenumber;

or

print '$linenumber is:' . "\n$linenumber";

it will print

$linenumber is:
22

What I find useful when wanting to print a variable name is to use single quotes so that the variables within will not be translated into their value making the code easier to read.

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you can backslash the $ to print it literally.

print "\$linenumber is: \n" . $linenumber;

that prints what you were expecting. You can also use single quotes if you don't want perl to interpolate variable names, but then the "\n" will be interpolated literally.

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This is a good point. Something I forgot to mention that. Thought it's not exactly what my question was. +1 anyway. –  kentcdodds Aug 2 '12 at 17:10
1  
the problem with using single quotes (as you suggested) is it will interpret the newline literally, see my edit. –  John Corbett Aug 2 '12 at 17:16

In Perl any string that is built with double quotes will be interpolated, so any variable will be replaced by its value. Like many other languages if you need to print a $, you will have to escape it.

print "\$linenumber is:\n$linenumber";

OR

print "\$linenumber is:\n" . $linenumber;

OR

printf "\$linenumber is:\n%s", $linenumber;

Scalar Interpolation

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When formulating this response, I found this webpage which explains the following information:

###################################################
#Note that when you have double quoted strings, you don't always need to concatenate. Observe this sample:

#!/usr/bin/perl

$a='Big ';
$b='Macs';
print 'I like to eat ' . $a . $b;

#This prints out:
#  I like to eat Big Macs

###################################################

#If we had used double quotes, we could have accomplished the same thing like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

$a='Big ';
$b='Macs';
print "I like to eat $a $b";

#Printing this:
#  I like to eat Big Macs
#without having to use the concatenating operator (.).

###################################################

#Remember that single quotes do not interpret, so had you tried that method with single quotes, like this:


#!/usr/bin/perl

$a='Big ';
$b='Macs';
print 'I like to eat $a $b';
#Your result would have been:
#  I like to eat $a $b
#Which don't taste anywhere near as good.

I thought this would be helpful to the community so I'm asking this and answering my own question. Other helpful answers are more than welcome!

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I like .= operator method:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $text .= "... contents ..."; # Append contents to the end of variable $text.
$text .= $text; # Append variable $text contents to variable $text contents.
print $text; # Prints "... contents ...... contents ..."
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