Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why can I do this:

public T GetMainContentItem<T>(string moduleKey, string itemKey)
{
    return (T)GetMainContentItem(moduleKey, itemKey);
}

but not this:

public T GetMainContentItem<T>(string moduleKey, string itemKey)
{
    return GetMainContentItem(moduleKey, itemKey) as T;
}

It complains that I haven't restricted the generic type enough, but then I would think that rule would apply to casting with "(T)" as well.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Because 'T' could be a value-type and 'as T' makes no sense for value-types. You can do this:

public T GetMainContentItem<T>(string moduleKey, string itemKey)
    where T : class
{
    return GetMainContentItem(moduleKey, itemKey) as T;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is incorrect, you can cast on value types, the result will be nullable, see this post and the answer by Jon Skeet: stackoverflow.com/questions/496096/… –  Mikhail Jul 21 '10 at 7:02

If T is a value type this is an exception, you need to make sure T is either Nullable or a class.

share|improve this answer

Is T a value type? If so, if the as operator fails, it will return null, which cannot be stored in a value type.

share|improve this answer

Extending on Yuriy Faktorovichs answer:

public T GetMainContentItem<T>(string moduleKey, string itemKey) where T: class
{
    return GetMainContentItem(moduleKey, itemKey) as T;
}

This will do the trick...

share|improve this answer

Because as T retrieves null in case that it cannot cast to T as opposed to (T) that throws an exception. So if T is not Nullable or class it can't be null ... i think.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.