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I'm trying to do the following:

  • Read a file's attributes
  • If the attributes match a certain condition, delete the file

Right now I'm using NSFileManager to perform a attributesOfItemAtPath:error: followed by removeItemAtPath:error:. I'm worried something will happen in between the two operations that invalidates the initial check.

What's the best way to make these two operations atomic?

Edit

The answers so far suggest file locking, which I have tried looking into. The closest thing I could find was setting the NSFileImmutable flag. But it seems like any other program could come along, unset it, and modify the file.. Is there a better way to lock a file?

Edit 2

Someone asked for a use case. Let's say I'm trying to keep two folders in sync. Any changes made to the files in one folder are mirrored in the other, and vice versa. If I delete file 1 from folder A, I will also delete file 1 from folder B. But if file 1 in folder B changes right before I delete it; then instead of deleting it, I want to sync it back to folder A

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1  
Which attributes do you check for? –  Martin R Aug 2 '12 at 18:05
    
NSFileModificationDate is one example –  pepsi Aug 2 '12 at 18:58
    
Are you envisioning a very short period between reading and acting, or a very long period? I mean, are you finding a file matching a predicate and immediately acting on it, or are you finding all files matching a predicate and then acting on all of them? –  Rob Napier Aug 2 '12 at 21:57
    
@RobNapier A very short period. I act on it immediately. –  pepsi Aug 2 '12 at 22:13
    
One possible method: 1) Open the file and get a lock to prevent modifications. 2) Check the attributes you are interested in. 3) Delete the file while it is locked. According to the man page for unlink, this will remove the file's name, but the file will only be deleted when all references to it are closed. 4) Close the file, releasing the lock and causing it to be deleted. I'm not at my computer to test this right now, but I see no reason it wouldn't work. –  ughoavgfhw Aug 5 '12 at 3:04

4 Answers 4

You can use mandatory (kernel enforced) file locking to lock the file in question to prevent changes being done to the file when you are operating on it. I know Linux and Solaris support mandatory file locking but I have no clue if OS X / HFS+ does and if so how to use it. Hope this helps.

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So you have more than one attribute query then? If so, why not just lock the file before starting the queries? Once done, unlock. Then if delete, delete.

There's a way to lock a file with Cocoa; I googled and worked that problem a few days back, but I already forgot the specific message; sorry..

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I suggest to use a message in order to accept or delete the file with this method:

fileManager:shouldRemoveItemAtPath:

The prototype of your development is to call method delete the file and in the method shouldRemoveItemAtPath: you accept (returns YES) or you reject (returns NO) as the file attributes values.

Hope this help

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It seems to me that you should just go ahead and delete the files that matched. There's no point to locking unless you are worried some other app will change the file such that it can't be deleted. Think about it; you found a file that matches your delete criteria. You want to delete it. Does it really matter if it changes in the meantime?

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Yes it matters. Let's say I'm trying to keep two folders in sync. Any changes made to the files in one folder are mirrored in the other, and vice versa. If I delete file 1 from folder A, I will also delete file 1 from folder B. But if file 1 in folder B changes right before I delete it; then instead of deleting it, I want to sync it back to folder A. –  pepsi Feb 4 '13 at 17:04
    
See, you kind of failed to mention that part. –  ashevin Feb 5 '13 at 15:37
    
I can add it to the description, but the question is really the same with or without that information. I'm asking 'How can I do x?', not 'Is x the right thing to do?' –  pepsi Feb 5 '13 at 15:56
    
I understand this is a hypothetical. Even in the given use case, locking is unnecessary. If you lock the file, you know it's not going to change before you delete it. So why would it matter if it really did change? Locking is an unnecessary complication. In any event, the how has been answered. I just wanted to point out that perhaps you were looking for the solution to the wrong problem. –  ashevin Feb 5 '13 at 17:02
    
Not sure I understand this: "If you lock the file, you know it's not going to change before you delete it. So why would it matter if it really did change?" Locking the file would solve the problem. However, I've yet to find a file locking API provided by OS X. –  pepsi Feb 5 '13 at 17:19

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