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I created a vector call nucleus and cell in the environment function that is void in c++. I then call the virus function which creates a vector of virus points. I then want to access the vector nucleus and cell in another function which is called by the virus. Is it possible to call the virus without having to pass it through the virus function? If not what is the best possible way to do it? Attached is my code. Thanks in advanced. Also I did not add all the code inside the function...

    struct point {
        float x;
        float y;
    };
    struct space{
        point point1;
        point point2;
        point point3;
        point point4;
    };

        int gelato(vector<point> & virus,int& times,int& iv, ofstream& data_file)
    {
        int a;
        int b;

        bool nc,cc,cmc;
        for(int i =0; i<virus.size(); i++)
        {
             a = virus[i].x;
             b = virus[i].y;

            nc = nucleus_check(nucleus,a,b); // **Need to call vector cell and nucleus**
            cc = cytoplasm_check(cell,a,b);
            cmc = cell_membrane_check(cell,a,b);
        }
    }

int moves(char n)
{
    int moved;
    int trial;

    if( n =='A')
    {
        moved = rand()%4;
    }
    else if(n=='B')
    {
        moved= rand()%3+1;
    }
    else if(n=='C')
    {
        trial= rand()%4;
        if(trial ==1)
        {
            moves('C');
        }
        else
        {
            moved = trial;
        }
    }
    else if(n =='D')
    {
        trial = rand()%4;
        if(trial == 2)
        {
            moves('D');
        }
        else
        {
            moved = trial;
        }
    }
    else if(n=='E')
    {
        moved = rand()%3;
    }

    return moved;
}   
int v_move(vector<point>& virus, int& iv, ofstream& data_file)
{

        gelato(virus,times,iv,data_file);
}
int rand_in(char a)
{}
void virus( ofstream& data_file)
{

    v_move(virus, iv, data_file);
}
void cell_space(int r)
{

    vector<point>cell;
}
void nucleus_space(int r)
{

    vector<point>nucleus;
}   

void environment() //**Where the vector nucleus and cell are created**
{
    //cell
    cell_space(16)

    //nucleus
    nucleus_space(4);
    //cout<<"Environment"<<endl;
}
int main()
{
    srand(time(NULL));
    data_file.open("data.csv");
    environment();
    virus(data_file);

    return 0;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I assume that you haven't yet learned/mastered object-oriented programming (OOP), and that you want to implement your program using the procedural programming paradigm. That's fine, as C++ supports several paradigms and doesn't force you to use OOP.

Since the "cell space" and "nucleus space" are meant to be used together as an entity you call "environment", you should define an environment structure that combines the two:

struct environment
{
    vector<point> cells;
    vector<point> nuclei;
};

The function that prepares the environment would look something like:

void prepare_environment(environment& env, // environment passed by reference
                         int cellCount, int nucleusCount)
{
    prepare_cells(env.cells, cellCount);
    prepare_nuclei(env.nuclei, nucleusCount);
};

void prepare_cells(std::vector<point>& cells, // cell vector passed by reference
                   int cellCount)
{
    cells.resize(cellCount);
    // Do other stuff to initialize cells
}

void prepare_nuclei(std::vector<point>& nuclei, int cellCount) {...}

In your main, you pass the environment structure to the functions that need to operate on it:

int main()
{
    Environment env;

    prepare_environment(env, 16, 4);
    move_virusus(env);
}

In the procedural programming paradigm, data is kept separate from the procedures that operate on that data. It's normal for data to be continually passed as arguments down the chain of helper functions. Resist the temptation of storing your data in global variables and having your functions directly access those global variables. Global variables result in code that is harder to test, harder to read, and harder to reuse.

You should name your procedures after the action they perform. There should be some kind of action verb in the name, e.g. prepare_environment. If the procedure operates on some kind of data, then the name of that data becomes the object of that verb, e.g. prepare_environment

Conversely, you should name your structures after the entity that they model. There should be a noun in the name, e.g. environment

Once you understand the tenets of procedural programming, I think you'll find it easier to understand object-oriented programming.

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