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I'm facing a really strange problem. When I start rails s, Rails logs as expected to log/development.log file.

As soon as I open it in an editor (e.g. Vi, TextMate) and save it from there, Rails doesn't write to it anymore! I have to restart the server, and then it works again.

This is really strange, it seems like Vi/TextMate "steals" the right to write the file, and only a restart of the Rails server regains the right again.

Anybody has an idea what's happening here? This is really annoying. I'm also only able to do rake log:clear as long as I didn't hit "save" for development.log, so it's exactly the same strange behavior...

I described a similar strange behavior like this before, and I suspected AckMate to have something to do with it. Sadly, I didn't get any response, see here.

Thanks a lot for help, this is really bugging me.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

vim writes your file to a temporary file and then renames it.

The Rails process keeps writing to the old opened fd.

share|improve this answer
    
This sounds interesting, but I'm still confused. What's an fd? And does TextMate the same? And why do I remember that some years ago, this didn't occur to me? – Joshua Muheim Aug 2 '12 at 18:03
    
TextMate likely does the same. – InternetSeriousBusiness Aug 2 '12 at 18:07
    
Still: what's an fd? I don't really get the technical internals you are pointing at. – Joshua Muheim Aug 2 '12 at 18:13
    
A file descriptor is a handle your application uses to access your file. You can even write to a deleted file if you have an fd open referencing it. – InternetSeriousBusiness Aug 2 '12 at 18:17
    
Okay, thanks for pointing me into this direction, this sounds reasonable (though not very welcome). Still strange that in earlier days, this didn't seem to have been a problem. – Joshua Muheim Aug 2 '12 at 18:19

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