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There is -

<html>
<body>
         <jsp:useBean id="user" class="user.UserData" scope="session"/>
</body>
</html>

And -

<html>
<body>
         <%
             Object user = session.getAttribute("user.UserData") ; 
         %>
</body>
</html>

Assume user.UserData exists on the session . is there any differnce between the two ways ?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A well known issue in JSPs is: avoid everything you can on using Java code with your page (.jsp). So the first approach fits better, do you agree? Taglibs <jsp:useBean /> among others are a nice way of accessing code without mixing the layers. This concepts I barely introduced are part of MVC "specification".

-- EDIT --

The second way of acessing a bean is known as scriptlets and should be avoided as always as possible. A brief comparison can be found here JSTL vs jsp scriptlets.

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<jsp:useBean id="user" class="user.UserData" scope="session"/>

is equivalent to

<%
    Object userDataObject = session.getAttribute("user") ; // id="user" of <jsp:useBean> maps to session attribute name "user"
%>

Besides, the scriptlet only reads existing data from session or returns null if no attribute is found.
If <jsp:useBean> finds attribute "user" in session to be null, It will create an instance of 'user.UserData' and add to attribute "user" in session scope.

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so what the "user.UserData" in jsp:useBean mean ? –  URL87 Aug 2 '12 at 18:29
    
the Object in session will be an instance of class "user.UserData". i.e. <jsp:useBean> will automatically type cast from class "Object" to "user.UserData. In terms of scriptlet - user.UserData userDataObject = (user.UserData) session.getAttribute("user") ; –  AshwinN Aug 4 '12 at 4:28
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